A Naturalist’s Feast for the Eyes

Hardly a Thanksgiving goes by without someone mentioning Benjamin Franklin’s affection for the American turkey. That founding father famously proposed it as the country’s national bird, arguing that it was a more virtuous creature than the bald eagle, which he despised as “a bird of bad moral character.” But the turkey has had at least one other prominent American fan. Naturalist and artist John James Audubon (1785-1851) began his ambitious “The Birds of America” picture series with an image of the wild turkey cock.

Audubon’s turkey cock is memorable for its vivid suggestion of movement, with the bird glancing backward, as if eyeing the approach of a predator, and pumping its legs forward in a purposeful stride. While his contemporaries’ painted birds are often as static as butterflies pinned to velvet, Audubon’s wildlife studies shimmer with kinetic intensity. For Audubon, nature was not a noun but a verb, and he conditioned viewers to think of the wild as a place where something is always happening, a precursor to the modern nature documentary.

The American turkey

As his depiction of the turkey cock also makes clear, Audubon was keenly aware of the stage on which his wildlife dramas unfolded. The canebreak in the background evokes the area near Beech Woods plantation in Louisiana where Audubon spotted the bird that inspired the picture. Audubon often used other artists to help create his backgrounds, but this wasn’t because he regarded the backdrops of his paintings as afterthoughts. He liked to make landscape an active character in his art, and in his picture of the turkey cock, scenery becomes a scene-stealer.

Notice how the cock’s gaze directs the viewer’s attention toward the thicket. What dark mystery lies beyond that curtain of green, inspiring the turkey’s apprehension? Audubon’s posing of this beguiling, unanswered question attests to his gifts as a showman. There’s also his lavish layering of color—the turkey cock is a pageant of dusky browns and hints of orange, along with shades of chocolate and mahogany.

Most bird books are arranged by type—shore birds in one chapter, song birds in another, birds of prey somewhere else. But Audubon broke with that tradition, instead sequencing his bird pictures for dramatic effect. In selecting the turkey cock as Plate No. 1 in his series, he seemed to celebrate the turkey as the alpha bird of the American landscape.

Audubon, who was also a perceptive writer about birds, devoted more words to the turkey than to any other bird in his “Ornithological Biography.” For many years, Audubon, a naturalized American of French heritage, closed his letters with a seal bearing the likeness of a turkey cock and the words “America My Country,” a gift from a friend that appeared to affirm the turkey as an icon of national greatness. Audubon even adopted a turkey as a pet, though—in a bit of darkly comic farce—his hunting dog almost nabbed it by accident. The pet survived that close call, only to be fatally shot later by another hunter.

What was it about turkeys that sparked the special admiration of an artist who had painted hundreds of other birds?

Obviously, the basic bigness of the turkey appealed to Audubon’s epic sense of scale. In a striking gesture of grandiosity, Audubon insisted on rendering the subjects of “The Birds of America” life-size, which required pages that were more than two feet wide and more than a yard high. The resulting project, which appeared between 1827 and 1838, was an early coffee-table book the size of a table itself. To promote his book, which cost about $1,000—roughly $23,000 in today’s dollars—for a finished copy, Audubon recruited wealthy subscribers, many of them across the Atlantic, by dressing the part of a frontiersman, creating a buzz in England. Old World admirers found Audubon’s paintings no less exotic than the artist, and the turkey had particular appeal because it seemed, like Audubon himself, such a magnificent American oddity.

With the turkey cock, as with so many of his other subjects, Audubon achieved lifelike effects in his pictures by using dead birds as his models. This isn’t unusual; even today, scientists and bird artists often depend on dead specimens for study. But in the days before air conditioning and refrigeration, the practice was often a race against time.

As he worked on his picture of the turkey cock at Beech Woods in 1825, Audubon’s methods drew the disgust of Robert Percy, a member of the plantation family. “The damned fellow kept it pinned up there until it rotted and stunk,” he recalled of Audubon and his lifeless subject. “I hated to lose so much good eating.”

The irony would not have been lost on Audubon, who probably also liked the turkey because it was such an inviting game bird. Much of his extended written commentary on the turkey deals with the best way to bag a bird for the table. Perhaps ornithologist Roger Tory Peterson had the best summary of Audubon’s culinary predilections: “Not only does he speak with a gourmet’s authority about the edibility of owls, loons, cormorants and crows, but also the gustatory delights of juncos, white-throated sparrows, and robins.”

Although some modern naturalists have trouble squaring Audubon’s hunting and his art, the simple truth is that each enterprise mutually sustained the other, relying on a shared set of skills: patience, sharp observation, and a shrewd understanding of wildlife.

What is also true is that Audubon often killed more birds than he could either eat or draw, making him a dubious poster child for conservation. He did raise occasional alarms about the health of bird populations, including that of the turkey, which he lamented as being “less numerous in every portion of the United States, even in those parts where they were very abundant thirty years ago.” Thanks to game laws and conservation efforts often spearheaded by hunters, wild turkey populations in North America have actually rebounded to more than seven million birds, up from 1.3 million birds in 1973.

Audubon “recognized and often speculated about the impact overhunting could have on wildlife populations,” biographer William Souder has written. “But he was never deterred. He sometimes said that a day in which he killed fewer than a hundred birds was a day wasted.”

Audubon’s real contribution to the cultural understanding of wildlife, said Mr. Peterson, “was not the conservation ethic but awareness. That in itself is enough; awareness inevitably leads to concern.”

Such awareness can also be the wellspring of gratitude, which is why this Thanksgiving, as in all others, Audubon’s wild turkey cock should be savored as a feast for the eyes.

Mr. Heitman, the author of “A Summer of Birds: John James Audubon at Oakley House,” ia a columnist for the Baton Rouge Advocate.

 

__________

Full article and photo: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704312504575618700444769566.html

 

Brant - Canada Postage Stamp | John James Audubon's Birds

Audubon, Haiti and Cruel Fate

Even the bird paintings were Inspired by his birthplace and reflect the fleeting nature of existence.

Since their publication in the 19th century, the 435 bird pictures in John James Audubon’s “The Birds of America” have become an iconic piece of Americana. But their peculiar and sometimes elegiac sensibility, so alert to the fleeting nature of existence, has its origins in what is now Haiti. Although the human tragedy unfolding on the island today surpasses in scale anything Audubon observed there centuries ago, his art and life are a reminder that people of an earlier age lived closer to sudden death than we can now easily imagine.

Audubon was born in Saint-Domingue, which would later become Haiti, in 1785, and he spent his early childhood there. Audubon’s first recorded memory, one that biographer Richard Rhodes traces to Saint-Domingue, involved a life snuffed out so casually that it haunted Audubon well into adulthood.

[taste0121]

The artist seemed fascinated by the precarious line that separates life from death, and how that line can vanish in a matter of seconds. That dark recognition started for him in what is now Haiti.

Audubon, who was born to French parents and spent his first few years on a sugar plantation, recalled a household that included several parrots and some monkeys. One morning, a monkey that regarded one of the parrots as a rival “showed his supremacy in strength over the denizen of the air, for, walking deliberately and uprightly toward the poor bird, he at once killed it, with unnatural composure,” Audubon wrote in an autobiographical sketch.

“The sensations of my infant heart at this cruel sight were agony to me,” Audubon told readers. “I prayed the servant to beat the monkey, but he, who for some reason preferred the monkey to the parrot, refused.”

The seeming injustice of life so quickly extinguished stuck with Audubon. He confessed to thinking of the incident “thousands of times,” and he said it was “as perfect in my memory as if it had occurred this very day.” Audubon also speculated that his memories of the experience might have helped spark his intense interest in bird art.

But as Mr. Rhodes has noted in his insightful “John James Audubon: The Making of an American,” Audubon also seemed to use his bird art to reflect on human mortality. Audubon’s natural mother died shortly after he was born, and he narrowly escaped a slave rebellion in Saint-Domingue by leaving for France, where he witnessed the bloody excesses of the French Revolution. Eventually settling in the U.S., Audubon lived and worked on an American frontier where friends and family members often died young. Audubon lost two daughters early in his marriage, and upon arriving in Louisiana in 1821 to pursue his bird pictures, he met a plantation mistress, Lucretia Pirrie, who had buried five children.

Sudden death was so commonplace in Audubon’s America, in fact, that he made part of his living as a deathbed artist—a portrait maker summoned to a grieving family to sketch a keepsake image of the recently departed. Audubon was so good at this macabre occupation, bringing the dead to life in his art, that a suffering father, eager to draw upon Audubon’s skill, had his dead child disinterred.

The same sleight of hand informs Audubon’s bird pictures, which are vividly lifelike although they usually used dead birds as their models. But for all their vitality, Audubon’s paintings resonate with loss as well as life—touched, in Audubon scholar Christoph Irmscher’s words, “by the experience of death, or at least impending death.”

Audubon seemed infinitely fascinated by the precarious line that separates life from death, and how that line can vanish in a matter of seconds. That dark recognition started for Audubon in what is now Haiti, and it gives his bird pictures an especially unsettling resonance as the people of his birthplace continue to mourn their dead.

Mr. Heitman, a columnist for The Baton Rouge Advocate, is the author of “A Summer of Birds: John James Audubon at Oakley House.”

__________

Full article and photo: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704509704575019790632407252.html

 

The Birds of America

Carduelis psaltria  Chardonneret mineur  /  Lesser Goldfinch  

Icterus galbula  Oriole à ailes blanches ou Oriole du Nord  /  Northern Oriole

Seiurus noveboracensis  Paruline des ruisseaux  /  Northern Waterthrush

Ixoreus nævius  Grive à collier  /  Varied Thrush  

audubon_433

The Lesser Goldfinch and the Northern Oriole are found all year round in the United States, in the South and the Midwest for the former, and all over the country for the Northern Oriole. They are common in dry, scrubby fields, in clear wooded areas and in watered copses. As for the Northern Waterthrush and the Varied Thrush, both inhabit the humid environments found in shrubbery, lakes, peat bogs and conifer woods. While the Northern Waterthrush is found throughout Québec and the Maritimes, the Varied Thrush is found more commonly in the North-American West and, during the winter, in the eastern United States. An insect-eater, the Northern Waterthrush feeds on insects, worms and snails. The length of the Lesser Goldfinch is 11 cm, the Northern Oriole’s is 22 cm, the Northern Waterthrush is 13 to 15 cm in length, and the length of the Varied Thrush is 24 cm.

Le chardonneret mineur et l’oriole à ailes blanches se rencontrent à l’année aux États-Unis, dans le sud et le Midwest pour le premier, et dans l’ensemble du pays pour le second. Ils sont communs dans les champs secs et broussailleux, les bois clairs et les boqueteaux arrosés. Quant à la paruline des ruisseaux et à la grive à collier, toutes deux fréquentent les milieux humides qu’offrent les buissons, les lacs, les tourbières et les bois de conifères. Alors que la première s’observe dans tout le Québec et dans les Maritimes, la seconde se rencontre davantage dans l’ouest de l’Amérique du Nord et, en hiver, dans l’est des États-Unis. Insectivore, la paruline se nourrit d’insectes, de vers et d’escargots. Le chardonneret mineur a une longueur de 11 cm, l’oriole à ailes blanches mesure 22 cm de longueur, la paruline des ruisseaux a une longueur qui varie entre 13 et 15 cm et la grive à collier a 24 cm de longueur.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
433/1993.35036
__________
Sayornis nigricans  Moucherolle noir  /  Black Phœbe
___
Contopus sordidulus  Pioui de l’Ouest  / Western Wood-Pewee
 
Sylvia montana  Aucun nom français  / Blue-Mountain Warbler
 
Empidonax minimus  Moucherolle tchébec  /  Least Flycatcher
 
Vireo olivaceus  Viréo aux yeux rouges  /  Red-eyed Vireo
 
Muscicapa minuta  Gobemouche  /  Small-headed Flycatcher

audubon_434

The Western Wood-Pewee lives in the conifer forests and open environments of Alaska, the Yukon, the American Midwest and Central America. An insect-eater, it complements its diet with small fruits. The Black Phœbe and the Least Flycatcher are also insect-eaters. The Black Phœbe distinguishes itself from its cousin, however, by its marked taste for small fish. Both are common in clear wooded areas, parks and leafy forests. The Black Phœbe nests in the western United States, while the territory of the Least Flycatcher is in southern Québec and the eastern United States.

The Red-eyed Vireo and the Small-headed Flycatcher are insect-eaters that live in two different worlds. A nesting bird of the deciduous and mixed forest zones of southern Québec, the Maritimes and the United States, the Vireo is an untiring songbird. As for the Small-headed Flycatcher, according to Audubon it had been seen only in New Jersey, and nested only in marshes and calm places. Another insect-eater, the Blue-Mountain Warbler has been seen only very rarely. Even Audubon himself never observed it with his own eyes. It has been said that this bird was never properly identified and described. The length of the Western Wood-Pewee is 16 cm, the Black Phœbe’s length is 16 to 17 cm, the Least Flycatcher’s is 13 to 14 cm and the Red-eyed Vireo’s is 14 to 17 cm, while the Blue-Mountain Warbler is 12 cm in length. The length of the Small-headed Flycatcher is unknown.

Le pioui de l’Ouest habite les forêts de conifères et les milieux ouverts de l’Alaska, du Yukon, du Midwest américain et de l’Amérique Centrale. Insectivore, il complète son alimentation par de petits fruits. Le moucherolle noir et le moucherolle de tchébec sont également insectivores. Le moucherolle noir se démarque toutefois de sa cousine par son goût marqué pour les petits poissons. Communes toutes deux dans les bois clairs, les parcs et les forêts de feuillus, la première niche dans l’ouest des États-Unis, et la seconde a pour territoire le sud du Québec et l’est des États-Unis.

Le viréo aux yeux rouges et le gobemouche sont des insectivores qui habitent deux univers différents. Oiseau nicheur des forêts de zones décidues et mixtes du sud du Québec, des Maritimes et des États-Unis, le viréo est un chanteur infatigable. Le gobemouche, quant à lui, n’aurait été vu qu’au New Jersey, selon Audubon, et nicherait que dans les marais et les endroits calmes. Autre insectivore, le Blue-Mountain Warbler n’aurait été vu que très rarement. Même Audubon ne l’aurait jamais observé de ses propres yeux. On dit que cet oiseau n’aurait pas été identifié et décrit de façon satisfaisante. Le pioui de l’Ouest a une longueur de 16 cm, le moucherolle noire a une longueur de 16 à 17 cm, le moucherolle tchébec a une longueur de 13 à 14 cm, le viréo aux yeux rouges mesure entre 14 et 17 cm de longueur et le Blue-Mountain Warbler mesure 12 cm de longueur. Quant au gobemouche, on ne connaît pas sa longueur.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
434/1993.35037
__________
Cinclus mexicanus  Cincle d’Amérique (immatures, mâle et femelle)  /  American Dipper (young male and young female)
 
audubon_435

Solitary, plump and vigorous, the American Dipper is common in the North-American West. It lives and feeds in mountain torrents and along wood-bordering rivers. Its length is19 cm.

Solitaire, rondelet et vigoureux, le cincle d’Amérique est commun dans l’ouest de l’Amérique du Nord. Il habite et se nourrit dans les torrents montagneux et les rivières limitrophes aux forêts. Il a une longueur de 19 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
435/1993.35038

__________
Full article and photos: http://www.mcq.org/audubon/catalogue/audubon_001.html

Note: The first edition of John James Audubon’s The Birds of America, used for this series of posts, contained 435 plates. The 145 posts (3 plates per post) of the series can be found in the category Birds of America.

The Birds of America

Brachyramphus marmoratus  Guillemot marbré ou Alque marbré  /  Marbled Murrelet  

audubon_430

The Marbled Murrelet nests in Alaska and along the North-American Pacific coast. Also found in Asia, it nests on the continent, in almost total obscurity. Indeed, it finds shelter in the cavities of certain trees. Its diet is essentially based on fish and includes sand-eels, herrings and anchovies. Threatened by human activities, Bald Eagles, Peregrine Falcons, seals and sea-lions, it has been added to the list of Canada’s vulnerable species. The length of the Marbled Murrelet is 25 cm.

Le guillemot marbré niche en Alaska et sur la côte pacifique nord-américaine. Observé également en Asie, il niche sur le continent, dans une obscurité quasi totale. En effet, il s’abrite dans les cavités de certains arbres. Son régime alimentaire est essentiellement piscivore et se compose de lançons, de harengs et d’anchois. Menacé par les activités humaines, les pygargues à tête blanche, les faucons pèlerins, les phoques et les otaries, il a été ajouté à la liste des espèces vulnérables du Canada. Le guillemot marbré mesure 25 cm de longueur.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
430/1993.35033

__________

Phœnicopterus ruber  Flamant rose  /  Greater Flamingo  

audubon_431

The main territory of the Greater Flamingo is the Caribbean and the Antilles. Other species can also be found in South America, at very high altitudes. It feeds in shallow lakes and lagoons, filtering food from the water with its beak that is equipped with an organ similar to whalebone plates. Very sociable, the Greater Flamingo lives in colonies and is renowned for its bright colour, its silhouette and its flight pattern. Its length is 117 cm and its average wingspan is 152 cm.

Le flamand rose a pour territoire principal les Caraïbes et les Antilles. D’autres espèces peuvent être observées également en Amérique du Sud, et ce, à de très hautes altitudes. Il se nourrit dans les lacs peu profonds et dans les lagunes, filtrant la nourriture de l’eau à l’aide de son bec muni d’un dispositif rappelant les fanons des baleines. Très social, le flamand rose vit en colonies et est reconnu pour sa couleur vive, sa silhouette et son vol. Il a une longueur d’environ 117 cm et une envergure moyenne de 152 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
431/1993.35034

__________

Athene cunicularia  Chevêche des terriers ou chouette des terriers  /  Burrowing Owl

Speotyto Cunicularia  Chevêche d’Athéna  /  Little Owl

Glaucidium gnoma  Chevêchette naine  /  Northern Pygmy-Owl

Asio flammeus  Hibou des marais  /  Short-eared Owl

  audubon_432

The Burrowing Owl and the Little Owl have but their name in common. Indeed, they live in different territories.While the former is found in open, dry areas in the Midwestern United States, the latter is found more commonly in cultivated regions, orchards, and hedges. The Little Owl has a very diverse diet made up of various insects, earth worms, voles, young sparrows, frogs, and lizards.

As for the Northern Pygmy-Owl and the Short-eared Owl, the former nests in the dense forests of the foothills and mountains of the North-American West, while the Short-eared Owl makes its habitat in the fields, marshes, peat bogs and tundra of Québec and the Maritimes. An aggressive predator, the Northern Pygmy-Owl hunts birds, some even larger than itself; whereas the Short-eared Owl, a raptor, captures voles, small birds and large insects. The only common point shared by these two birds is that they both hunt at dusk and at dawn. The length of the Burrowing Owl is 24 cm, the Little Owl’s length is 21 to 23 cm and its wingspan is 50 to 56 cm, and the Northern Pygmy-Owl’s length is 17 cm, while the Short-eared Owl is 33 to 43 cm in length.

La chevêche des terriers et la chevêche d’Athéna n’ont en commun que le nom. En effet, elles habitent des territoires différents. Alors que la première s’observe en terrains ouverts et secs dans le Midwest des États-Unis, la seconde se rencontre davantage dans les régions cultivés, les vergers et les haies. Cette dernière a un régime alimentaire fort diversifié qui se compose de divers insectes, de vers de terre, de campagnols, de jeunes passereaux, de batraciens et de lézards.

Quant à la chevêchette naine et au hibou des marais, la première niche dans les forêts denses des contreforts et des montagnes de l’ouest de l’Amérique du Nord, et le second a pour habitat les champs, les marais, les tourbières et la toundra du Québec, et les Maritimes. Prédateur agressif, la chevêchette chasse les oiseaux, parfois même plus gros qu’elle, et rapace, le hibou des marais capture les campagnols, les petits oiseaux et les gros insectes. Seul point commun entre ces deux oiseaux : ils chassent à l’aube et au crépuscule. La chevêche des terriers a une longueur de 24 cm, la chevêche d’Athéna a une longueur de 21 à 23 cm et une envergure de 50 à 56 cm, la chevêchette naine mesure 17 cm longueur et le hibou des marais a une longueur qui varie entre 33 et 43 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
432/1993.35035

___________

Full article and photos: http://www.mcq.org/audubon/catalogue/audubon_001.html

The Birds of America

Haematopus bachmani  Huîtrier de Bachman  /  American Black Oystercatche  

audubon_427

Audubon thought he had two species here, and named one for John KirkTownsend, the ornithologist and the other one for his friend John Bachman.

Audubon crut qu’il était en présence de deux espèces différentes et nomma l’une en l’honneur de l’ornithologiste John Kirk Townsend et l’autre du nom de son ami John Bachman.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
427/1993.35030
__________
Aphriza virgata  Bécasseau du ressac  /  Surfbird
_____
audubon_428

The Surfbird is a nesting bird of the Alaska tundra. It spends the winter along the rocky coastline of the North-American West. The length of the Surfbird is 25 cm.

Le bécasseau du ressac est un oiseau nicheur de la toundra de l’Alaska. Il hiverne sur les rivages rocheux de la côte Ouest nord-américaine. Le bécasseau du ressac a une longueur de 25 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
428/1993.35031

__________

Polysticta stelleri  Eider de Steller  /  Steller’s Eider

audubon_429

Steller’s Eider is found only in the United States. Its habitat includes rocky coasts and grassy tundra. Its length is 43 cm.

On rencontre l’eider de Steller uniquement aux États-Unis. Il a pour habitat les côtes rocheuses et la toundra herbeuse. Il a une longueur de 43 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
429/1993.35032

__________

Full article and photos: http://www.mcq.org/audubon/catalogue/audubon_001.html

The Birds of America

Molothrus ater   Vacher à tête brune  /  Brown-headed Cowbird

Passerella iliaca  Bruant fauve  /  Fox Sparrow

Carpodacus mexicanus  Roselin familier  /  House Finch

Passerina amœna  Passerin azuré  /  Lazuli Bunting

Hesperiphona vespertina  Gros-bec errant  /  Evening Grosbeak

Leucosticte arctoa  Roselin brun  /  Rosy Finch  

audubon_424

The Brown-headed Cowbird, the Fox Sparrow, the House Finch and the Evening Grosbeak all share a point in common: their habitats are in southern Québec and the Maritimes. Only the Lazuli Bunting and the Rosy Finch have their territory in the North-American West. All are fond of insects, small fruits and small seeds, they nest in conifer, leafy and mixed forests, and in open and urban areas. Most are migratory birds and fly off toward the United States to spend the winter there. The length of the Brown-headed Cowbird is 17 to 21 cm, the Fox Sparrow’s length is 17 to 19 cm, the House Finch’s is 13 to 14 cm, the Lazuli Bunting’s is 14 cm, and the Evening Grosbeak’s length is 18 to 22 cm, while the Rosy Finch is 16 cm in length.

Le vacher à tête brune, le bruant fauve, le roselin familier et le gros-bec errant ont tous un point en commun : ils ont pour habitats le sud du Québec et les Maritimes. Seuls le passerin azuré et le roselin brun ont pour territoire l’Ouest nord-américain. Tous amateurs d’insectes, de petits fruits et de graines, ces oiseaux nichent en forêts de conifères, de feuillus et mixtes, et en milieux ouverts et urbains. Migrateurs, ils s’envolent, pour la plupart, vers les États-Unis, où ils hiverneront. Le vacher à tête brune a une longueur de 17 à 21 cm, le bruant fauve a une longueur de 17 à 19 cm, le roselin familier a une longueur de 13 à 14 cm, le passerin azuré mesure 14 cm de longueur, le gros-bec errant mesure entre 18 et 22 cm de longueur et le roselin brun a une longueur de 16 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
424/1993.35027
__________
Calypte anna  Colibri d’Anna  /  Anna’s Hummingbird

audubon_425

Anna’s Hummingbird has a very rapid wingbeat, capable of producing up to 40 beats a second. Present all over North America, it extends its territorial range from Alaska to the Tierra del Fuego, all altitudes included. Although it feeds on insects, spiders and sap like all the other hummingbirds, its diet is largely based on the nectar of Fuchsia, Tobacco and Agave flowers. Every day, it must absorb the nectar from 1000 flowers in order to sustain its legendary energy. Anna’s Hummingbird is 9 to 10 cm in length.

Appelé également oiseau-mouche, le colibri d’Anna a un battement d’ailes très rapide, pouvant atteindre les 40 battements par seconde. Présent partout en Amérique du Nord, il étend son territoire de l’Alaska à la Terre de Feu, et ce, toutes altitudes confondues. Bien qu’il se nourrisse d’insectes, d’araignées et de sève comme tous les autres colibris, son alimentation repose en grande partie sur le nectar des fleurs du fuchsia, du tabac et de l’agavé. Chaque jour, il se doit d’ingérer le nectar de 1000 fleurs afin de conserver son énergie légendaire. Le colibri d’Anna a une longueur de 9 à 10 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
425/1993.35028
__________
Gymnogyps Californianus  Condor de Californie  /  California Condor 

audubon_426

The rarest bird of prey in the world, the California Condor is in perpetual decline. This decrease is mainly attributed to the disappearance of its habitat, lead poisoning, game hunting, and persecution. Some efforts are being made, however, to increase the population. This condor frequents the foothills and mountains of southern California. Carnivorous, it hunts in groups and will attack stags, cows, sheep, bisons, rabbits and squirrels. It is also reported to eat carrion. The California Condor is the largest bird in North America: its length is 119 to 140 cm and its wingspan is 274 to 280 cm.

Oiseau rapace le plus rare au monde, le condor de Californie est en perpétuel déclin.  On attribue cette décroissance principalement à la disparition de son habitat, à l’empoisonnement par le plomb, à la chasse au gibier et à la persécution. Des efforts sont toutefois faits pour accroître sa population. Ce condor fréquente les avant-monts et les montagnes du centre et du sud de la Californie. Carnivore, il chasse en groupe et s’attaque à des cerfs, des vaches, des moutons, des bisons, des lapins et des écureuils. On le dit également charognard. Le condor de Californie est le plus grand oiseau d’Amérique du Nord : il a une longueur qui varie de 119 à 140 cm et une envergure qui varie de 274 à 280 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
426/1993.35029
__________
See also: La fragilité – Frailty

__________

Full article and photos: http://www.mcq.org/audubon/catalogue/audubon_001.html

The Birds of America

Pelecanus occidentalis  Pélican brun  /  Brown Pelican  

audubon_421

The territory of the Brown Pelican is along the East and West Coasts of North America. In Canada, it is sometimes found in Nova Scotia, on Cape Breton Island and in the southern part of British Columbia. Increasingly numerous along the American East Coast, it has disappeared, however, from along the Gulf of Mexico, the effects of pesticides having decimated it gradually over the 20th century. Long hunted for its extensible sac which, once dried, was used to store tobacco, powder and buckshot, the Brown Pelican still remains solidly entrenched in its territories. Its length is 122 cm and its wingspan is 213 cm.

Le pélican brun a pour territoire les côtes est et ouest de l’Amérique du Nord. Au Canada, on l’aperçoit parfois en Nouvelle-Écosse, au Cap-Breton et dans le sud de la Colombie-Britannique. De plus en plus nombreux sur le long de la côte Est américaine, il est pourtant disparu le long du golfe du Mexique; les effets des pesticides le décimant graduellement au cours du XXe siècle. Longtemps chassé pour sa poche extensible qui, une fois séchée, servait à ranger du tabac, de la poudre et des chevrotines, le pélican brun demeure toujours bien ancré dans ses territoires. Il a une longueur de 122 cm et une envergure de 213 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
421/1993.35024
___________
Buteo lagopus  Buse pattue  /  Rough-legged Hawk 
audubon_422
 
The Rough-legged Hawk is the only one of its species capable of hovering in place. It moves about the fields and other open environments of the Nouveau-Québec and Basse-Côte-Nord regions, but passes through all the regions of Québec during the migration period. Although it spends the winter in all the American States, it occasionally takes the risk of facing the cold by staying on in Québec. Its diet is mainly made up of lemmings and moles but, during the migration and winter periods, it feeds on other rodents, frogs and small birds. The length of the Rough-legged Hawk is 50 to 59 cm and its average wingspan is 142 cm.

La buse pattue est la seule de son espèce qui peut voler en « sur place ». Elle fréquente les champs et autres milieux ouverts du Nouveau-Québec et de la Basse-Côte-Nord, mais passe dans toutes les régions du Québec en période migratoire. Bien qu’elle hiverne dans tous les états américains, elle se risque, à l’occasion, à braver le froid en demeurant au Québec. Son régime alimentaire se compose essentiellement de lemmings et de mulots, mais en périodes migratoire et hivernale, elle se nourrit d’autres rongeurs, de grenouilles et de petits oiseaux. La buse pattue a une longueur de 50 à 59 cm et une envergure moyenne de 142 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
422/1993.35025
__________
Colinus cristatus  Colin huppé  /  Crested Bobwhite
 
Oreortyx pictus   Colin des montagnes  /  Mountail Quail
audubon_423

The Crested Bobwhite nests in open environments such as swamps and the edges of woods. It feeds mainly on seeds but occasionally will also eat invertebrates and plants. The Mountail Quail makes its habitat in the bushy ravines and mountainsides of the American West Coast. The length of the Crested Bobwhite is 28 cm. The Mountain Quail’s length is 25 to 35 cm.

Le colin huppé niche dans les milieux ouverts tels que les savanes et les orées de bois. Il s’alimente surtout de graines mais se nourrit, à l’occasion, d’invertébrés et de végétation. Le colin des montagnes, quant à lui, a pour habitat les ravins broussailleux et les flancs de montagnes de la côte Ouest américaine. Le colin des montagnes a une longueur de 28 cm. Le colin huppé mesure entre 25 et 35 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
423/1993.35026

___________

Full article and photos: http://www.mcq.org/audubon/catalogue/audubon_001.html

The Birds of America

Lagopus mutus  Lagopède alpin (mue d’automne)  /  Ptarmigan (changing from Summer to Winter plumage)

Lagopus leucurus   Lagopède à queue blanche (plumage d’hiver)  /  White-tailed (Winter plumage)

audubon_418

The Ptarmigan nests essentially in the tundra or the high rocky slopes of western Canada. In Audubon’s time, an impressive number of Ptarmigans were killed every year. It is said that in Canada and Scandinavia, 300 birds could be hunted every day. Not especially fearful, the Ptarmigans that survived gunshots would only move aside a short distance, thus still remaining extremely easy prey. The length of the ptarmigan is 32 to 36 cm.

Le lagopède niche essentiellement dans la toundra ou les hauts versants rocheux de l’ouest du Canada. À l’époque d’Audubon, un nombre impressionnant de lagopèdes étaient tués chaque année. On raconte qu’au Canada et en Scandinavie, 300 oiseaux pouvaient être chassés chaque jour. Peu farouches, les lagopèdes survivants des coups de fusils ne s’éloignaient que de quelques pas seulement, demeurant toujours des proies extrêmement faciles. Le lagopède alpin mesure de 32 à 36 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
418/1993.35021
__________
Perisoreus canadensis  Mesangeai du Canada ou Geai du Canada  /  Gray Jay
 
Catharus guttatus  Grive solitaire  /  Hermit Thrush
 
Myadestes townsendi  Solitaire de Townsend  /  Townsend’s Solitaire  
audubon_419

The Gray Jay, the Hermit Thrush and Townsend’s Solitaire are all common birds of conifer forests, peat bogs and wooded valleys. The nesting area of the first two species is the boreal zone and southern Québec together with the Maritimes, whereas the habitat of Townsend’s Solitaire is the West Coast of Canada and the United States. All three are insect-eaters, and prefer beetles, various insects, small fruits, and ants for food. Only the Gray Jay complements its diet with mushrooms, eggs, fledglings and carrion. The length of the Gray Jay is 25 to 33 cm, the Hermit Thrush’s length is 16 to 19 cm, while Townsend’s Solitaire is 22 cm in length.

Le mesangeai du Canada, la grive solitaire et le solitaire de Townsend sont tous des oiseaux communs des forêts de conifères, des tourbières et des vallées boisées.  Les deux premières espèces ont comme aire de nidification la zone boréale et le sud du Québec ainsi que les Maritimes, alors que la troisième a pour habitat la côte ouest du Canada et des États-Unis.  Tous trois insectivores, ils optent pour des coléoptères, des insectes divers, des petits fruits et des fourmis comme nourriture.  Seul le mesangeai du Canada complète son régime alimentaire par des champignons, des œufs, des oisillons et de la charogne.  Le mesangeai du Canada a une longueur de 25 à 33 cm, la grive solitaire a une longueur de 16 à 19 cm et le solitaire de Townsend mesure 22 cm de longueur.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
999/1993.35022
__________
Agelaius phœniceus  Carouge à épaulettes (mâle et femelle)  /  Red-winged Blackbird (male and female)  
audubon_420

Present throughout Canada during the nesting period, the Red-winged Blackbird nests in all the southern regions of Quebec and the Maritimes, and increasingly spends its winters in the northern United States. It prefers to settle in open and humid places, such as ditches, reed mace marshes and stream or river banks, but will also nest in drier terrain, in pasture and cultivated fields. Its diet varies with the seasons, but it feeds mainly on insects and cultivated seeds, including corn. Besides, it is a menace for farmers who find their fields ravaged by this bird. But in spite of everything, it still does them some great services, such as attacking the insects that destroy their newly-planted crops. The Red-winged Blackbird reaches 19 to 26 cm in length.

Présent dans tout le Canada en période de nidification, le carouge à épaulettes niche dans toutes les régions du Québec méridional et des Maritimes et hiverne de plus en plus dans le nord des États-Unis. Il préfère s’installer dans les endroits ouverts et humides, notamment les fossés, les marais de quenouilles et les bordures de cours d’eau, mais peut nicher également en terrains plus secs, pâturages et champs cultivés. Son régime alimentaire varie selon les saisons, mais il se nourrit essentiellement d’insectes et de grains cultivés, notamment le maïs. D’ailleurs, il est une menace pour les cultivateurs qui voient leurs champs ravagés par cet oiseau. Malgré tout, il leur rend d’éminents services : le carouge s’attaque aux insectes qui détruisent leurs plantations. Le carouge à épaulettes peut mesurer entre 19 et 26 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
420/1993.35023

__________

Full article and photo: http://www.mcq.org/audubon/catalogue/audubon_001.html

The Birds of America

Certhia americana  Grimpereau brun  /  Brown Creeper

Sitta pygmæa  Sittelle pygmée  /  Pygmy Nuthatch

audubon_415

The Brown Creeper bears its name well: like a mouse, it climbs trees with its eyes always looking up! Found in conifer and mixed forests as well as in marshy woods, it nests throughout southern Québec and the Maritimes. A migratory bird, it flies of to the South at the first shivers of the cold, and spends the winter in all the types of wooded areas encountered in the eastern and midwestern United States. An insect-eater, it searches in the cracked bark of trees in order to find insects, spiders, eggs and cocoons. The habitat range of the Pygmy Nuthatch corresponds to the area covered by the Ponderosa Pine and coastal pines of California. The length of the Brown Creeper is 13 to 15 cm, as compared to the Pygmy Nuthatch’s 11 cm.

Le grimpereau brun porte bien son nom : tel une souris, il grimpe aux arbres en regardant toujours vers le haut! Observé dans les forêts de conifères et mixtes, ainsi que dans les bois marécageux, il niche dans tout le sud du Québec et dans les Maritimes. Oiseau migrateur, il s’envole vers le Sud dès les premiers frissons, hivernant dans tous les types de boisés rencontrés dans l’est et le Midwest des États-Unis. Insectivore, il fouille les fentes de l’écorce des arbres afin de trouver divers insectes, araignées, œufs et cocons. Quant à la sittelle pygmée, son aire d’habitat correspond à celle du pin ponderosa et des pins côtiers de la Californie. Le grimpereau brun a une longueur de 13 à 15 cm et la sittelle pygmée mesure 11 cm de longueur.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
415/1993.35018
__________
Picoides villosus  Pic chevelu  /  Hairy Woodpecker
 
Melanerpes lewis  Pic de Lewis  /  Lewis’ Woodpecker
 
Colaptes auratus  Pic flamboyant  /  Northern Flicker
 
Melanerpes carolinus  Pic à ventre roux  /  Red-bellied Woodpecker
 
Sphyrapicus ruber  Pic à poitrine rouge  /  Red-breasted Sapsucker  
audubon_416

The main territories of the Hairy Woodpecker and the Northern Flicker are in southern Québec and the Maritimes. The Hairy Woodpecker lives in mixed and conifer forests, slash-and-burn land and urban parks, whereas the Northern Flicker prefers clear wooded areas, the edges of clear-cut forest zones, and rural gardens. Both have a diet that is made up mainly of insects, ants, fruits and sap. They stand out from each other, however, by the fact that the Hairy Woodpecker is sedentary, while the Northern Flicker migrates southward during the winter.

Lewis’ Woodpecker, the Red-bellied Woodpecker and the Red-breasted Sapsucker have the United States as their main territory. The first two birds are found in the clear wooded areas, valleys and suburban areas of the American East and Midwest, and the Red-breasted Sapsucker is found in the mixed and conifer forests of the West Coast. Fond of insects and fruits, they complement their diet with acorns and various nuts. The length of the Hairy Woodpecker is 22 to 27 cm, Lewis’ Woodpecker is 27 cm in length, the Northern Flicker’s length is 31 to 35 cm, the Red-bellied Woodpecker’s is 22 to 25 cm, and the Red-breasted Sapsucker’s length is 22 cm.

Le pic chevelu et le pic flamboyant ont pour territoires principaux le sud du Québec et les Maritimes. Le premier habite les forêts mixtes et de conifères, les brûlés et les parcs urbains, tandis que le second préfère les forêts claires, les brûlés, les lisières de coupes forestières et les jardins de campagne. Tous deux ont un régime alimentaire qui se compose essentiellement d’insectes, de fourmis, de fruits et de sève. Toutefois, ils se distinguent par le fait que le pic chevelu est sédentaire et que le pic flamboyant migre vers le Sud, en hiver.

Quant au pic de Lewis, au pic à ventre roux et au pic à poitrine rouge, ils ont les États-Unis comme territoire principal. On retrouve les deux premiers dans les bois clairs, les vallées et les banlieues du Midwest et de l’Est américain, et le troisième dans les forêts mixtes et de conifères de la côte Ouest. Amateurs d’insectes et de fruits, ils complètent leur alimentation par des glands et des noix diverses. Le pic chevelu a une longueur de 22 à 27 cm, le pic de Lewis a une longueur de 27 cm, le pic flamboyant a une longueur de 31 à 35 cm, le pic à ventre roux mesure entre 22 et 25 cm de longueur et le pic à poitrine rouge a une longueur de 22 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
416/1993.35019
__________
Picoides tridactylus  Pic tridactyle  /  Three-tœd Woodpecker
 
Picoides villosus  Pic chevelu  /  Hairy Woodpecker

audubon_417

The Three-tœd Woodpecker and the Hairy Woodpecker are found all year round in southern Québec and in the Maritimes. Living in boreal forests, conifer forests and mature forests, they feed on larvae and beetles, spiders and fruits, and the sap and resin they find on the surfaces of trees. They can also be found all year round in all the other Canadian Provinces and all the American States, except the Three-tœd Woodpecker that is found in the American West. The length of the Three-tœd Woodpecker is 20 to 25 cm, while the Hairy Woodpecker’s is 20 to 27 cm.

Le pic tridactyle et le pic chevelu sont observés à l’année dans le sud du Québec et dans les Maritimes. Habitants des forêts boréales, des forêts de conifères et des forêts âgées, ils s’alimentent de larves et de coléoptères, d’araignées et de fruits, de sève et de résine qu’ils trouvent à la surface des arbres. On peut également les rencontrer à l’année dans toutes les autres provinces canadiennes et dans tous les états américains, à l’exception du pic tridactyle que l’on retrouve uniquement dans l’Ouest américain. Le pic tridactyle a une longueur de 20 à 25 cm et le pic chevelu mesure entre 22 et 27 cm de longueur.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
417/1993.35020.
 
__________
Full article and photos: http://www.mcq.org/audubon/catalogue/audubon_001.html

The Birds of America

Phalacrocorax penicillatus  Cormoran de Brandt  /  Brandt’s Cormorant

Phalacocorax pelagicus  Cormoran Pélagique  /  Pelagic Cormorant  

audubon_412

Brandt’s Cormorant and the Pelagic Cormorant both nest in colonies on the rocky islands and in the cornices of cliffs along the Pacific Coast. Essentially fish-eaters, the two Cormorants fish regularly and in great numbers amid the counter-currents and undertows, which forces them to stop and rest on beaches or reefs between two fishing sorties. Both have webbed feet and have a permeable plumage. Brandt’s Cormorant is 89 cm in length with a 122-cm wingspan, whereas the length of the Pelagic Cormorant is 66 cm and its wingspan is 99 cm.

Le cormoran de Brandt et le cormoran Pélagique nichent tous deux en colonies sur les îles rocheuses et les corniches des falaises de la côte du Pacifique. Essentiellement piscivores, les deux cormorans pêchent régulièrement, et en grand nombre, dans les contre-courants et les ressacs, les forçant à se reposer sur la grève ou le récif entre deux séances de pêche. Tous deux ont les doigts palmés et un plumage perméable. Le cormoran de Brandt a une longueur de 89 cm et une envergure de 122 cm, tandis que le cormoran Pélagique mesure 66 cm de longueur et 99 cm d’envergure.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
412/1993.35015
__________
Callipepla Californica  Colin de Californie  /  California Quail  

audubon_413

A vigorous bird, the California Quail lives in the clear wooded areas, bushy hills and valleys of California. Consistent in its habits, it returns to the same places to feed on leaves, seeds, fruits, insects, spiders and snails. The length of the California Quail is 24 to 28 cm.

Oiseau vigoureux, le colin de Californie habite les forêts claires, les collines broussailleuses et les vallées de la Californie. Fidèle à ses habitudes, il se rend aux mêmes endroits pour se nourrir de feuilles, de graines, de fruits, d’insectes, d’araignées et d’escargots. Le colin de Californie a une longueur variant de 24 à 28 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
413/1993.35016
__________
Dendroica tigrina  Paruline tigrée  /  Cape May Warbler
 
Vermivora chrysoptera  Paruline à ailes dorées  /  Golden-winged Warbler  
audubon_414

The Cape May Warbler and the Golden-winged Warbler adore insects, budworms and spiders! Whether they find them respectively in treetops or among dead leaves, both birds enjoy this feast of nature. While the territory of the Cape May Warbler is in southern Québec and the Maritimes, the Golden-winged Warbler’s habitat is in the western and southern parts of the province. Absent from Québec during the winter, the Cape May Warbler leaves its nesting area to reach the Antilles and the southernmost tip of Florida, and the Golden-winged Warbler flies off toward uncertain destinations. Both birds are 12 to 14 cm in length.

La paruline tigrée et la paruline à ailes dorées adorent les insectes, les tordeuses d’épinettes et les araignées! Qu’elles les trouvent respectivement à la cime des arbres ou dans les feuilles mortes, toutes deux se régalent de ce festin de la nature. Alors que la première paruline a pour territoire le sud du Québec et les Maritimes, la seconde a pour habitat l’ouest et le sud de la province. Absentes du Québec en hiver, la paruline tigrée quitte son aire de nidification pour les Antilles et l’extrême sud de la Floride, et la paruline à ailes dorées s’envole vers des cieux incertains. La paruline tigrée et la paruline à ailes dorées ont une longueur de 12 à 14 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
414/1993.35017

__________

Full article and photos: http://www.mcq.org/audubon/catalogue/audubon_001.html

The Birds of America

Sterna forsteri  Sterne de Forster  /  Forster’s Tern

Sterna trudeaui  Sterne de Trudeau  /  Trudeau’s Tern

audubon_409

Forster’s Tern nests in very dispersed colonies in the marshes of the south-eastern United States. During the summer, it can be seen in the Midwest, and during the winter, on the West Coast. With respect to Trudeau’s Tern, Audubon said that he had received one from his friend, Doctor James Trudeau, who had killed it in New Jersey and told him that many could be found on Long Island. Today, this bird is said to be found in Chili and Argentina. It is known that the specimen described by Audubon exists, but its location still remains uncertain. The length of Forster’s Tern is 37 cm and its wingspan is 79 cm. Trudeau’s Tern is 10 to 12 cm in length.

La sterne de Forster niche en colonies très éparses dans les marais du sud-est des États-Unis. En été, on peut la croiser dans le Midwest et en hiver, sur la côte Ouest. Quant à la sterne de Trudeau, Audubon dit en avoir reçu une de son ami, le docteur James Trudeau. Ce dernier l’aurait tuée dans le New Jersey et lui aurait dit qu’on pouvait en observer plusieurs sur l’île de Long Island. Aujourd’hui, on dit trouver cet oiseau au Chili et en Argentine. On sait que le spécimen décrit par Audubon existe mais la localisation demeure toujours incertaine. La sterne de Forster a une longueur de 37 cm et une envergure de 79 cm. La sterne de Trudeau a une longueur qui varie entre 10 et 12 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
409/1993.35012
__________
Sterna nilotica  Sterne hansel  /  Gull-billed Tern

audubon_410

The Gull-billed Tern nests in the saltwater marshes and along the beaches of the United States East Coast and at Salton Lake, in California. An insect-eater, it hunts its prey over fields and marshes. The length of the Gull-billed Tern is 36 cm.

La sterne hansel niche dans les marais salés et sur les plages de la côte est des États-Unis et au lac Salton, en Californie. Insectivore, elle chasse ses proies au-dessus des champs et des marais. La sterne hansel a une longueur de 36 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
410/1993.35013

__________

Cygnus columbianus  Cygne siffleur  /  Tundra Swan

 

audubon_411

A Nordic tundra bird of Alaska, the Yukon, Nouveau-Québec and Hudson’s Bay, the Tundra Swan crosses the great North lakes diagonally to reach their winter home around Chesapeake Bay. This odyssey of 4 000 to 5 000 km is cleverly avoided by a few shrewd swans who spend the winter along the Californian coast instead. A royal bird in the England of times past, the Tundra Swan feeds mainly on plants, especially the reeds and tubers of aquatic plants, and invertebrates. Its length is 121 to 152 cm.

Oiseau nordique de la toundra de l’Alaska, du Yukon, du Nouveau-Québec et de la baie d’Hudson, le cygne siffleur traverse en diagonale les grands lacs du Nord pour atteindre leurs quartiers d’hiver, la baie de Chesapeake. Cette odyssée de 4 000 à 5 000 km est évitée par quelques cygnes plus astucieux qui hivernent davantage sur la côte californienne. Autrefois oiseau royal de l’Angleterre, le cygne siffleur se nourrit principalement de végétaux, notamment de tiges et de tubercules de plantes aquatiques, et d’invertébrés. Il a une longueur qui varie entre 121 et 152 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
411/1993.35014

__________

Full article and photos: http://www.mcq.org/audubon/catalogue/audubon_001.html

The Birds of America

Cygnus buccinator  Cygne trompette  /  Trumpeter Swan  

audubon_406

The territory of the Trumpeter Swan is the northern part of North America. Present in Alaska and the Yukon, it nests more commonly in Alberta where large colonies are found. During the winter, it can be seen on the stretches of smooth water bordering the coasts of British Columbia, and in the United States – more specifically in Ohio, Wyoming and Montana. It feeds mostly on leaves, insects, crustaceans, tubers, and the rhizomes of aquatic plants that it finds in shallow water. Though the species is no longer threatened, certain factors do not act in its favour: humans, eagles and owls, coyotes and mink, diseases and parasites, meteorological conditions, food shortages and lead poisoning. The length of the Trumpeter Swan is 152 cm and its wingspan is 300 cm.

Le cygne trompette a pour territoire le nord de l’Amérique du Nord. Présent en Alaska et au Yukon, il niche davantage en Alberta où l’on retrouve d’importantes colonies. En période hivernale, on le croise sur les plans d’eau longeant les côtes de la Colombie-Britannique, et aux États-Unis, en Ohio, au Wyoming et au Montana plus exactement. Il s’alimente surtout de feuilles, d’insectes, de crustacés, de tubercules et de rhizomes de plantes aquatiques qu’il trouve en eau peu profonde. Bien que l’espèce ne soit plus menacée, certains facteurs ne lui sont pas favorables : les humains, les aigles et les hiboux, les coyotes et les visons, les maladies et les parasites, les conditions météorologiques, les pénuries de nourriture et les empoisonnements au plomb. Le cygne trompette a une longueur de 152 cm et une envergure de 300 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
406/1993.35009

___________

Phœbetria palpebrata  Albatros fuligineux  /  Light-mantled Albatross  

audubon_407

In Audubon’s time, it was believed that the Light-mantled Albatross originated from the United States, especially from Oregon. However, it originally came from the Antarctic, where it still breeds in small colonies along the crests of cliffs. Besides, a very low rate of reproduction has been noted for this species, the female raising only one fledgling every three years. Upon reaching maturity, the Albatross can weigh as much as 3 kg, and its average longevity is 50 to 60 years. Its average wingspan has been estimated at 200 cm.

À l’époque d’Audubon, on croyait que l’albatros fuligineux venait des États-Unis, de l’Oregon plus particulièrement. Or, il est originaire de l’Antarctique, où il s’y reproduit encore en petites colonies sur le haut des falaises. On constate d’ailleurs un très faible taux de reproduction chez cette espèce, la femelle n’élevant qu’un seul petit à tous les trois ans. À maturité, l’albatros peut peser jusqu’à 3 kg et a une longévité moyenne de 50-60 ans. Son envergure moyenne est de 200 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
407/1993.35010
___________
Melanitta nigra  Macreuse noire  /  Black Scoter
audubon_408  
The Black Scoter is a dark-coloured sea duck. A nesting bird, its habitat covers the rivers, lakes and ponds of the Nouveau-Québec tundra. During the migration period, it frequents the smooth water expanses of southern Québec and the Maritimes and, during the winter season, it navigates in Fundy Bay and along the Atlantic coastline of Nova Scotia. Its diet is made up mainly of crustaceans and molluscs, mussels, snails, and especially barnacles. The length of the Black Scoter is 43 to 54 cm.

La macreuse noire est un canard de mer de couleur sombre. Oiseau nicheur, il a pour habitat les rivières, les lacs et les étangs de la toundra du Nouveau-Québec. En période migratoire, elle fréquente les plans d’eau du sud du Québec et des Maritimes et en saison hivernale, elle navigue dans la baie de Fundy et sur la côte atlantique de la Nouvelle-Écosse. Son régime alimentaire se compose essentiellement de crustacés et de mollusques, de moules, d’escargots et de balanes, plus particulièrement. La macreuse noire a une longueur de 43 à 54 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
408/1993.35011

___________

See also: La fluidité – Wavy

http://www.mcq.org/audubon/cygne.html

___________

Full article and photos: http://www.mcq.org/audubon/catalogue/audubon_001.html

The Birds of America

Bucephala islandica  Garrot d’Islande ou Garrot de Barrow  /  Barrow’s Goldeneye

audubon_403

Barrow’s Goldeneye nests in the North-American West, near ponds and small lakes with wooded edges. A migratory bird, it spends the winter in Québec and the Maritimes, mainly in the coastal waters of the estuary and gulf of the Saint Lawrence, and along the coastlines of the three Maritime provinces. The length of Barrow’s Goldeneye is 41 to 53 cm.

Le garrot d’Islande ou de Barrow niche dans l’Ouest nord-américain, près des étangs et des petits lacs aux rives boisées. Oiseau migrateur, il hiverne au Québec et dans les Maritimes, principalement dans les eaux côtières de l’estuaire et du golfe du Saint-Laurent, et sur les côtes des trois provinces maritimes. Le garrot de l’Islande a une longueur variant de 41 à 52 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
403/1993.35006

__________

Podiceps nigricollis  Grèbe à cou noir  /  Eared Grebe

audubon_404

The Eared Grebe nests in large colonies on the freshwater lakes of the American Midwest, and it spends the winter in the western United States and, less commonly, along the coastline of the Gulf of Mexico and along the East Coast, south of New York. The length of the Eared Grebe is 32 cm.

La grèbe au cou noir niche en grandes colonies sur les lacs d’eau douce du Midwest des États-Unis et elle hiverne dans l’Ouest américain et, rarement, sur la côte du golfe du Mexique et sur la côte Est, au sud de New York. La grèbe au cou noir a une longueur de 32 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
404/1993.35007

__________

Calidris pusilla  Bécasseau semipalmé  /  Semipalmated Sandpiper  

audubon_405

Protected by the Migratory Birds Convention Act, the Semipalmated Sandpiper nests in the humid tundra and the sandy zones of the Nouveau-Québec region and the Arctic. During the migration period, it is found in southern Québec and the Maritimes, where it is especially common in Fundy Bay. During the winter, its territory includes the Pacific coastline of Central America as well as the North and the north-western Pacific coastline of South America. The smallest shore bird in Canada, it feeds on insects, molluscs, worms and crustaceans. The Semipalmated Sandpiper is 14 to 17 cm in length.

Protégé par la Loi sur la Convention concernant les oiseaux migrateurs, le bécasseau semipalmé niche dans la toundra humide et les zones sablonneuses du Nouveau-Québec et de l’Arctique. En période migratoire, il est observé dans le Québec méridional et les Maritimes, où il est particulièrement abondant dans la baie de Fundy. En hiver, il a pour territoire la côte pacifique de l’Amérique Centrale ainsi que le Nord et la côte pacifique nord-ouest de l’Amérique du Sud. Plus petit oiseau de rivage du Canada, il se nourrit d’insectes, de mollusques, de vers et de crustacés. Le bécasseau semipalmé a une longueur de 14 à 17 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
405/1993.35008

__________

Full article and photos: http://www.mcq.org/audubon/catalogue/audubon_001.html

The Birds of America

Carduelis psaltria  Chardonneret mineur  /  Lesser Goldfinch

Carduelis hornemanni  Sizerin blanchâtre  /  Hoary Redpoll

Calcarius pictus  Bruant de Smith  /  Smith’s Longspur

Emberiza townsendii  Bruant  /  Townsend’s Bunting

Piranga ludoviciana  Tangara à tête rouge  /  Western Tanager

audubon_400

The Lesser Goldfinch, Smith’s Longspur and the Western Tanager are American nesting birds, located mainly in the Midwest, South and West of the United States. The first bird is common in dry, scrubby fields, the second one lives more commonly in the tundra and in humid prairies, and the third one prefers by far being in conifer forests. The Western Tanager feeds on insects, berries, various fruits and buds. The Hoary Redpoll nests in northern Québec, the Arctic and Greenland, in rocky ravines and slopes, whereas Townsend’s Bunting has never been seen again since Audubon’s time. The length of the Lesser Goldfinch is 11 cm, the Western Tanager’s length is 18 cm, the Hoary Redpoll’s is 11 to 15 cm,. The length of Townsend’s Bunting was 14.5 cm, while Smith’s Longspur is 15 cm in length.

Le chardonneret mineur, le bruant de Smith et le tangara à tête rouge sont des oiseaux nicheurs américains, localisés surtout dans le Midwest, le sud et l’ouest des États-Unis. Le premier est commun dans les champs secs et broussailleux, le second fréquente davantage la toundra et les prés humides et le troisième préfère de loin les forêts de conifères. D’ailleurs, ce dernier s’y nourrit d’insectes, de baies, de fruits divers et de bourgeons. Quant au sizerin blanchâtre et au bruant, le premier niche dans le nord du Québec, dans l’Arctique et au Grœnland, dans les ravins et les pentes rocailleuses, et le second, il n’a jamais été revu depuis l’époque d’Audubon. Le chardonneret mineur a une longueur de 11 cm, le tangara à tête rouge a une longueur de 18 cm, le sizerin blanchâtre mesure entre 11 et 15 cm de longueur. Le bruant mesurait environ 14,5 cm de longueur et le bruant de Smith 15 cm de longueur.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
400/1993.35003

__________

Mergus serrator  Harle huppé ou Bec-scie à poitrine rousse  /  Red-breasted Merganser  

audubon_401

The only type of duck that feeds on fish, the Red-breasted Merganser is extremely gluttonous. Indeed, it gorges so much on fish and crustaceans as well as molluscs, worms, insects, and aquatic plants, that it is unable to fly afterward! Although its territory extends over almost the entire continent, it is found most commonly in northern Québec, in the Saint Lawrence estuary, in the Baie-des-Chaleurs, on the Îles-de-la-Madeleine, and along the coastlines of the three Maritime provinces. The length of the Red-breasted Merganser is 51 to 64 cm.

Seul type de canard à se nourrir de poissons, le harle huppé est glouton à l’extrême. En effet, il se gave tant de poissons, de crustacés, de mollusques, de vers, d’insectes et de plantes aquatiques qu’il est incapable de voler par la suite! Bien que son territoire s’étend sur presque la totalité du continent, on l’observe surtout dans le nord du Québec, dans l’estuaire du Saint-Laurent, dans la baie des Chaleurs, aux Îles-de-la-Madeleine et sur les côtes des trois provinces maritimes. Le harle huppé a une longueur de 51 à 64 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
401/1993.35004

__________

Synthliboramphus antiquus  Guillemot à cou blanc ou Alque à cou blanc (mature et immature)  /  Ancient Murrelet (adult and young)

Æthia cristatella  Starique cristatelle ou Alque panachée  /  Crested Auklet

Æthia pusilla  Starique minuscule ou Alque minuscule  /  Least Auklet

Brachyramphus marmoratus  Guillemot marbré ou Alque marbré / Marbled Murrelet 

Cerorhinca monocerata  Macareux Rhinocéros  /  Rhinoceros Auklet

audubon_402

The Ancient Murrelet, the Crested Auklet, the Least Auklet and the Rhinoceros Auklet all have in common the fact that they are birds living on the North-West Pacific Coast. Those four birds live more commonly in colonies on cliffs and beaches, along shorelines and on rocky islands in the ocean. Their diet is essentially made up of fish, if we base our judgment on the diet of the Marbled Murrelet, who feeds on sand-eels, herrings and anchovies. The length of the Ancient Murrelet is 25 cm, the Crested Auklet’s length is 27 cm, the Least Auklet’s is 16 cm and the Rhinoceros Auklet’s is 38 cm.

Le guillemot à cou blanc, la starique cristatelle, la starique minuscule et le macareux rhinocéros ont tous en commun d’être des oiseaux habitant la côte nord-ouest du Pacifique. Ces oiseaux vivent davantage en colonies sur les falaises, les plages, les rives et les îles rocheuses de l’océan. Leur régime alimentaire est essentiellement piscivore, si l’on en juge par celui du guillemot marbré qui se nourrit de lançons, de harengs et d’anchois. Le guillemot à cou blanc a une longueur de 25 cm, la starique cristatelle a une longueur de 27 cm, la starique minuscule mesure 16 cm de longueur et la macareux rhinocéros a pour longueur 38 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
402/1993.35005

__________

Full article and photos: http://www.mcq.org/audubon/catalogue/audubon_001.html

The Birds of America

Eudocimus ruber  Ibis rouge  /  Scarlet Ibis  

audubon_397

Originating from South America, the Scarlet Ibis is regularly found in Florida’s mangroves, mud-flats and marshes. The greater part of the world’s population of Scarlet Ibis, however, is found in Venezuela. Threatened, it is hunted for its feathers, which supply the local crafts industry in Guyana. The length of the Scarlet Ibis is 50 cm.

Originaire d’Amérique du Sud, l’ibis rouge est régulièrement observé dans les mangroves, les vasières et les marais de la Floride. L’essentiel de la population mondiale de l’ibis rouge se trouve toutefois au Vénézuela. Menacé, il est chassé pour sa chair et pour ses plumes qui alimentent, en Guyane, l’artisanat local. L’ibis rouge mesure 50 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
397/1993.35000
__________
Spizella pallida  Bruant des plaines  /  Clay-coloured Sparrow
 
Junco hyemalis  Junco ardoisé  /  Dark-eyed Junco
 
Passerina amœna  Passerin azuré  /  Lazuli Bunting  
audubon_398

The Clay-coloured Sparrow and the Dark-eyed Junco are two nesting birds from Québec and the Maritimes. Their habitats are clearings, dry lands, pastures and conifer forests, and they feed essentially on various sorts of insects and seeds. Both birds spend the winter in the United States, though the Dark-eyed Junco is well capable of spending the winter within its nesting range. The Lazuli Bunting nests in the riverside shrubbery and the mixed forests of the western United States. The length of the Clay-coloured Sparrow is 13 to 14 cm, the Dark-eyed Junco’s length is 15 to 17 cm, and the Lazuli Bunting’s is 14 cm.

Le bruant des plaines et le junco ardoisé sont deux oiseaux nicheurs du Québec et des Maritimes. Ils ont pour habitats les clairières, les terrains secs, les pâturages et les forêts de conifères, et ils s’alimentent essentiellement d’insectes et de graines de diverses natures. Tous deux hivernent aux États-Unis, bien que le junco ardoisé peut tout aussi bien passer l’hiver dans son aire de nidification. Quant au passerin azuré, il niche dans les buissons riverains et les forêts mixtes de l’ouest des États-Unis. Le bruant des plaines a une longueur de 13 à 14 cm, le junco ardoisé a une longueur de 15 à 17 cm et le passerin azuré mesure 14 cm de longueur.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
398/1993.35001
__________
Dendroica fusca  Paruline à gorge orangée  /  Blackburnian Warbler
 
Dendroica virens  Paruline à gorge noire  /  Black-throated Green Warbler
 
Oporornis tolmiei  Paruline des buissons  /  MacGillivray’s Warbler  
audubon_399

The Blackburnian Warbler and the Black-throated Green Warbler both nest in the boreal fir forests and the mixed forests of southern Québec and the Maritimes. Essentially insect-eaters, they feed mainly on budworms that they capture on the surfaces of leaves or at the tops of conifers. During the winter season, they are found in the United States, the former in the North-East and the latter in the West. MacGillivray’s Warbler is found in the dense underbrushes of the American West. The length of the Blackburnian Warbler is 11 to 14 cm and the Black-throated Green Warbler’s length is 12 to 14 cm, while MacGillivray’s Warbler is 13 cm in length.

La paruline à gorge orangée et la paruline à gorge noire nichent toutes deux dans les sapinières boréales et les forêts mixtes du Québec méridional et des Maritimes. Essentiellement insectivores, elles s’alimentent surtout de tordeuses qu’elles capturent à la surface des feuilles ou à la cime des conifères. En saison hivernale, on les retrouve aux États-Unis, la première dans le Nord-Est et la seconde, dans l’Ouest. Quant à la paruline des buissons, on l’observe dans les sous-bois épais de l’Ouest américain. La paruline à gorge orangée a une longueur de 11 à 14 cm, la paruline à gorge noire a une longueur de 12 à 14 cm et la paruline des buissons a une longueur de 13 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
399/1993.35002

__________

Full article and photos: http://www.mcq.org/audubon/catalogue/audubon_001.html

The Birds of America

Calcarius ornatus  Bruant à ventre noir  /  Chestnut-collared Longspur

Zonotrichia atricapilla  Bruant à couronne dorée  /  Golden-crowned sparrow

Carduelis magellanica  Chardonneret de Magellan  /  Hooded Siskin

Pipilo erythrophthalmus  Tohi à flancs roux  /  Rufous-sided Towhee  

audubon_394

The Chestnut-collared Longspur and the Golden-crowned sparrow are found in the Canadian West, inland as well as on the seacoast. They rarely visit the East of the country, they nest respectively in the humid steppes, where the vegetation is dense and tall, and in the peat bogs of the tundra. The Hooded Siskin is a South-American species that nests in the coastal regions and forest edges of Uruguay and eastern Argentina. Not very fearful, it feeds on seeds, berries, insects and grassy plants. As for the Rufous-sided Towhee, its habitat is southern Quebec. Comfortable in dense underbrush, it feeds on berries, weeds, insects and grasses. The length of the Chestnut-collared Longspur is 15 cm, the Golden-crowned sparrow’s length is 18 cm, the Hooded Siskin’s is 12 to 13 cm, and the Rufous-sided Towhee’s length is 19 to 22 cm.

On rencontre le bruant à ventre noir et le bruant à couronne dorée dans l’Ouest canadien, autant dans les terres que sur la côte. Rares visiteurs dans l’est du pays, ils nichent respectivement dans les steppes humides, où la végétation est dense et haute, et dans les tourbières de la toundra. Le chardonneret de Magellan est une espèce sud-américaine qui niche dans les régions côtières et les lisières des forêts de l’Uruguay et de l’est de l’Argentine. Peu craintif, il se nourrit de graines, de baies, d’insectes et d’herbacés. Le tohi à flancs roux, quant à lui, a pour habitat le sud du Québec. Amateur de sous-bois denses, il se nourrit de baies, de mauvaises herbes, d’insectes et de graminées. Le bruant à ventre noir a une longueur de 15 cm, le bruant à couronne dorée a une longueur de 18 cm, le chardonneret de Magellan a une longueur de 12 à 13 cm et le tohi à ventre roux a une longueur de 19 à 22 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
394/1993.34997

__________

Dendroica nigrescens  Paruline grise ou Paruline grise à gorge noire  /  Black-throated Gray Warbler

Dendroica occidentalis  Paruline à tête jaune  /  Hermit Warbler

Dendroica coronata  Paruline à croupion jaune  /  Yellow-rumped Warbler

audubon_395

The Black-throated Gray Warbler and the Hermit Warbler are found in the western United States, in conifers forests and shrubbery. The Yellow-rumped Warbler nests throughout Québec and the Maritimes and spends the winter along the south-eastern coast of New Brunswisk and along the south-western coast of Nova Scotia. Found in mixed or conifer forests, it feeds on spruce budworms and small fruits, and drinks sap. The length of the Black-throated Gray Warbler is 13 cm, the Hermit Warbler’s length is 14 cm, and the Yellow-rumped Warbler is 12 to 16 cm in length.

On retrouve les parulines grise et à tête jaune dans l’ouest des États-Unis, dans les forêts de conifères et les arbustes. La paruline à croupion jaune, quant à elle, niche dans tout le Québec et les Maritimes et hiverne sur la côte sud-est du Nouveau-Brunswick et sur la côte sud-ouest de la Nouvelle-Écosse. Observée dans les forêts mixtes et de conifères, elle se nourrit de tordeuses, de petits fruits, et s’abreuve de sève. La paruline grise a une longueur de 13 cm, la paruline à tête jaune a une longueur de 14 cm et la paruline à croupion jaune mesure entre 12 et 16 cm de longueur.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
395/1993.34998
__________
Larus hyperboreus  Goéland bourgmestre  /  Glaucous Gull  
audubon_396

The Glaucous Gull is a Nordic bird of Alaska, the Arctic and the Nouveau-Québec region. Passing through all the regions of Québec and the Maritimes during the migration period, it spends the winter in the Saint Lawrence gulf and estuary, along the Atlantic coastline and in Fundy Bay. Its diet is quite varied, and made up of penguin eggs and fledglings, adult birds, invertebrates, fish, insects and small fruits. A carrion-eater, it clears beaches of carcasses and eats the fæces and placentas of seals. The length of the Glaucous Gull is 66 to 76 cm and its average wingspan is 152 cm.

Le goéland bourgmestre est un oiseau nordique de l’Alaska, de l’Arctique et du Nouveau-Québec. De passage dans toutes les régions du Québec et des Maritimes en période de migration, il hiverne dans l’estuaire et le golfe du Saint-Laurent, sur le littoral atlantique et dans la baie de Fundy. Son régime alimentaire est fort varié, se composant d’œufs et d’oisillons d’alcidés, d’oiseaux adultes, d’invertébrés, de poissons, d’insectes et de petits fruits. Charognard, il nettoie les plages de cadavres et mange les fèces et les placentas de phoques. Le goéland bourgmestre a une longueur de 66 à 76 cm et une envergure moyenne de 152 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
396/1993.34999

__________

Full article and photos: http://www.mcq.org/audubon/catalogue/audubon_396.html

The Birds of America

Branta bernicla  Bernache cravant  /  Brant Goose

audubon_391

A small seaside goose, the Brant Goose has a body that is hardly larger than that of a duck. A nesting bird of the tundra, this goose lives in the Arctic. During the migration period, it passes through all the regions of Québec and the Maritimes, especially in the coastal marshes of the estuary and gulf of the Saint Lawrence. During the winter, it settles in the Grand-Manan Islands, in New Brunswick. Its diet is made up of grasses during the nesting season, and sea grass (Zostera) and algae during the migration and winter seasons. The length of the Brant Goose is 58 to 76 cm.

Petite bernache des bords de mer, la bernache cravant a un corps à peine plus gros que celui d’un canard. Oiseau nicheur de la toundra, cette bernache habite l’Arctique. En période migratoire, elle est de passage dans toutes les régions du Québec et des Maritimes, plus particulièrement dans les marais côtiers de l’estuaire et du golfe du Saint-Laurent. En hiver, elle s’installe dans l’archipel de Grand-Manan, au Nouveau-Brunswick. Son régime alimentaire se compose de graminées, en saison de nidification, et de zostères marines et d’algues, en saisons migratrice et hivernale. La bernache cravant a une longueur de 58 à 76 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
391/1993.34994
__________
Parabuteo unicinctus  Buse de Harris  /  Harris’s Hawk  
audubon_392

Harris’s Hawk frequents the semi-arid woods and scrublands of the southern United States. It can stray off toward the North and the West of the country if it escapes its hawk house. Generally silent, it squawks when close to its nest. The length of Harris’s Hawk is 53 cm and its wingspan is 117 cm.

La buse de Harris fréquente les bois semi-arides et les endroits broussailleux du sud des États-Unis. Elle peut errer vers le nord et vers l’ouest du pays si elle s’est échappée de sa fauconnerie. Généralement silencieuse, elle est criarde à proximité de son nid. La buse de Harris a une longueur de 53 cm et une envergure de 117 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
392/1993.34995
__________
Sialia currucoides  Merlebleu azuré  /  Mountain Bluebird
 
Dendroica townsendi  Paruline de Townsend  /  Townsend’s Warbler
 
Sialia mexicana  Merlebleu de l’Ouest  /  Western Bluebird  

audubon_393

The Mountain Bluebird, Townsend’s Warbler and the Western Bluebird are all found in the western part of North America. While Townsend’s Warbler prefers conifer forests for its habitat, the Mountain and Western Bluebirds prefer fields, prairies, farms, groves and clear wooded areas. Essentially insect-eaters, these Bluebirds also feed on small fruits. The Mountain Bluebird is renowned for its gentle character. Its length is 16.5 to 19 cm, while the length of Townsend’s Warbler is 13 cm and the Western Bluebird’s is 18 cm.

Le merlebleu azuré, la paruline de Townsend et le merlebleu de l’Ouest s’observent tous dans l’ouest de l’Amérique du Nord. Tandis que la paruline de Townsend préfère les forêts de conifères comme habitat, les deux merlebleus préfèrent les champs, les prés, les fermes, les bosquets et les bois clairs. Essentiellement insectivores, ces merlebleus se nourrissent également de petits fruits. On reconnaît au merlebleu azuré un doux caractère. Ce dernier a une longueur de 16,5 à 19 cm, la paruline de Townsend a une longueur de 13 cm et le merlebleu de l’Ouest mesure 18 cm de longueur.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
393/1993.34996

__________

Full article and photos: http://www.mcq.org/audubon/catalogue/audubon_001.html

The Birds of America

Icterus galbula  Oriole du Nord ou Oriole de Baltimore  /  Northern Oriole

Agelaius tricolor  Carouge de Californie  /  Tricoloured Blackbird

Xanthocephalus  Carouge à tête jaune  /  Yellow-headed Blackbird  

audubon_388

The Northern Oriole, the Tricoloured Blackbird and the Yellow-headed Blackbird live in groves, fields, pastures and freshwater marshes, where they can feed on insects, seeds and fruits. The territories of the Northern Oriole and the Yellow-headed Blackbird include southern Québec and the Maritimes, although the Yellow-headed Blackbird can be found as far away as Alaska. The length of the Northern Oriole is 18 to 23 cm, the Tricoloured Blackbird’s length is 22 cm, and the Yellow-headed Blackbird’s length is 22 to 28 cm.

L’oriole du Nord, le carouge de Californie et le carouge à tête jaune habitent les bocages, les prés, les pâturages et les marais d’eau douce, là où ils peuvent s’alimenter d’insectes, de graines et de fruits. L’oriole du Nord et le carouge à tête jaune ont pour territoires le sud du Québec et les Maritimes, bien que le carouge peut être observé jusqu’en Alaska. L’oriole du Nord a une longueur de 18 à 23 cm, le carouge de Californie a une longueur de 22 cm et le carouge à tête jaune a une longueur de 22 à 28 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
388/1993.34991
__________
Picoides borealis  Pic à face blanche  /  Red-cockaded Woodpecker

audubon_389

Found in the United States, the Red-cockaded Woodpecker lives in clear, mature pine groves. It digs out cavities in trees, and the resin that trickles from them, and repulses predators, reveals its presence. Although the species is not threatened, it is in decline. The situation is explained by the destruction of its habitat. The length of the Red-cockaded Woodpecker is 22 cm.

Observé aux États-Unis, le pic à face blanche habite les pinèdes claires et parvenues à maturité. Il creuse des cavités dans les arbres et la résine qui s’en découle, qui repousserait les prédateurs, révèle sa présence. Bien que l’espèce ne soit pas menacée, elle est en déclin. On explique la situation par la destruction de son habitat. Le pic à face blanche a une longueur de 22 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
389/1993.34992
__________
Calamospiza melanocorys  Bruant noir et blanc  /  Lark Bunting  
 
Chondestes grammacus  Bruant à joues marron  /  Lark Sparrow  
 
Melospiza melodia  Bruant chanteur  /  Song Sparrow

audubon_390

The Lark Bunting, the Lark Sparrow and the Song Sparrow have one point in common: they like open places. While the two first birds can meet more easily in the dry steppes, along the roadsides and clear wooded areas of the United States, the Song Sparrow seeks shelter more commonly in the thickets bordering the watercourses and pastures of southern Québec and the Maritimes. Besides, the Song Sparrow finds varied food there: seeds, small fruits, insects and small worms. The length of the Lark Bunting is 18 cm, the Lark Sparrow’s length is 17 cm, and the Song Sparrow is 15 to 18 cm in length.

Le bruant noir et blanc, le bruant à joues marron et le bruant chanteur ont un point en commun : ils aiment les lieux ouverts. Alors que les deux premiers bruants se rencontrent plus facilement dans les steppes sèches, les bords de routes et les bois clairs des États-Unis, le bruant chanteur s’abrite davantage dans les fourrés bordant les cours d’eau et les pâturages du sud du Québec et des Maritimes. D’ailleurs, ce dernier y trouve une nourriture variée : graines, petits fruits, insectes et petits vers. Le bruant noir et blanc a une longueur de 18 cm, le bruant à joues marron a une longueur de 17 cm et le bruant chanteur mesure entre 15 et 18 cm de longueur.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
390/1993.34993

__________

Full article and photos: http://www.mcq.org/audubon/catalogue/audubon_001.html

The Birds of America

Riparia riparia  Hirondelle de rivage  /  Bank Swallow

Tachycineta thalassina  Hirondelle à face blanche  /  Violet-green Swallow  

audubon_385

The Bank Swallow and the Violet-green Swallow share only their name in common! Indeed, the territory of the former includes the embankments and sand-pits of southern Québec and the Maritimes, whereas the latter prefers the clear wooded areas of the North-American West Coast. A migratory bird, the Bank Swallow leaves eastern Canada for South America during the winter, while the Violet-green Swallow is sedentary. The Bank Swallow is fond of insects and its length is 12 to 14 cm, while the Violet-green Swallow’s length is 13 cm.

L’hirondelle de rivage et l’hirondelle à face blanche n’ont en commun que le nom! En effet, la première a pour territoire les berges et les sablières du sud du Québec et des Maritimes, alors que la seconde préfère les bois clairs et les banlieues de la côte ouest nord-américaine. Oiseau migrateur, l’hirondelle de rivage quitte l’est canadien pour l’Amérique du Sud en hiver, tandis que l’hirondelle à face blanche est sédentaire. Amateurs d’insectes, l’hirondelle de rivage a une longueur de 12 à 14 cm et l’hirondelle à face blanche a une longueur de 13 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
385/1993.34988
__________
Casmerodius albus  Grande Aigrette  /  Great Egret  
audubon_386

The Great Egret is a familiar figure in the Estrie region, especially at the western end of Lac Saint-François. Just as present in the other regions of Québec and the Maritimes, it is also found in the eastern united States, where it nests in marshes, mangroves and mud-flats. Essentially a fish-eater, it complements its diet with amphibians, insects, small mammals and fledglings. Intensively hunted for its feathers in the early 20th century, the Great Egret is a species in declining numbers. Its length is 88 to 107 cm, with an average wingspan of 130 cm.

La grande Aigrette est une habituée de la Montérégie, notamment à l’extrémité ouest du lac Saint-François. Tout aussi présente dans les autres régions du Québec et des Maritimes, elle est également observée dans l’est des États-Unis, où elle niche dans les marais, les mangroves et les vasières. Essentiellement piscivore, elle complète son alimentation par des amphibiens, des insectes, des petits mammifères et des oisillons. Intensément chassée pour ses plumes au début du XXe siècle, la population de la grande Aigrette est en nombre décroissant. Elle a une longueur de 88 à 107 cm et une envergure moyenne de 130 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
386/1993.34989
__________
Plegadis falcinellus  Ibis falcinelle  /  Glossy Ibis  
audubon_387

A nomad and a great migratory bird, the Glossy Ibis nests in colonies close to smooth stretches of freshwater and saltwater. Found along the coast of Maine, in the United States, it extends its territory towards the North, bringing it into Québec and the Maritimes in the spring, along the shoreline of the Saint Lawrence River and in the coastal marshes of the Maritimes. With its curved beak, it probes the ground in search of crayfish, insects, small fish and amphibians. The length of the Glossy Ibis is 56 to 64 cm and its average wingspan is 91 cm.

Nomade et grand migrateur, l’ibis falcinelle niche en colonies à proximité de plans d’eaux douce et salée. Observé sur la côte du Maine, aux États-Unis, il étend progressivement son territoire vers le Nord, l’amenant au Québec et dans les Maritimes au printemps, en bordure du fleuve Saint-Laurent et dans les marais côtiers des Maritimes. À l’aide de son bec arqué, il sonde le sol à la recherche d’écrevisses, d’insectes, de petits poissons et d’amphibiens. L’ibis falcinelle a une longueur de 56 à 64 cm et une envergure moyenne de 91 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
387/1993.34990

___________

Full article and photos: http://www.mcq.org/audubon/catalogue/audubon_001.html

The Birds of America

Tympanuchus phasianellus  Tétras à queue fine  /  Sharp-tailed Grouse  

audubon_382

A sedentary nesting bird of the Abitibi region, the Sharp-tailed Grouse resembles the Greater Prairie-chicken. Its habitat includes the open peat bogs, prairies, Artemisia bushes, the edges of woods, and canyons, where it can easily find something to peck! The length of the adult Sharp-tailed Grouse is 42 to 47 cm.

Oiseau nicheur sédentaire de l’Abitibi, le tétras à queue fine ressemble à la poule-des-prairies. Il a pour habitat les tourbières dégagées, les prairies, les buissons d’armoise, l’orée des bois et les canyons, là où il peut trouver facilement de quoi se mettre sous le bec! Le régime alimentaire du tétras adulte est composé à 90% de végétaux et à 10% d’insectes et d’araignées. Le tétras à queue fine a une longueur de 42 à 47 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
382/1993.34985
__________
Asio otus  Hibou moyen-duc  /  Long-eared Owl  
audubon_383

Discreet and silent, the Long-eared Owl is a night-hunting raptor that feeds on voles, mice, shrews and small birds. Present all year round in southern Québec and in the Maritimes, it is also found in the United States. The Long-eared Owl lives in mixed and conifer forests. Its length is 33 to 41 cm.

Discret et silencieux, le hibou moyen-duc est un rapace nocturne qui se nourrit de campagnols, de souris, de musaraignes et de petits oiseaux. Présent à l’année dans le sud du Québec et dans les Maritimes, on peut l’observer également aux États-Unis. Habitant des forêts mixtes et de conifères, le hibou moyen-duc a une longueur variant de 33 à 41 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
383/1993.34986
__________
Spiza americana  Dickcissel d’Amérique  /  Dickcissel

audubon_384

A nesting bird of the Canadian West, the Dickcissel feeds on insects that it captures on the ground. Fond of seeds and cultivated seeds, it is not shy about visiting the feeding dishes made available for it. During the migration period, it is located East of the Appalachians and, sometimes, along the eastern coastline of the country. It is also found in the eastern United States. The length of the Dickcissel is 15 to 18 cm.

Oiseau nicheur de l’Ouest canadien, le dickcissel d’Amérique se nourrit d’insectes qu’il capture au sol. Amateur de graines et de grains cultivés, il ne se gêne pas pour fréquenter les mangeoires mis à sa disposition. En période migratoire, on le localise à l’est des Appalaches et, quelques fois, sur la côte est du pays. On le retrouve également dans l’Est américain. Le dickcissel d’Amérique a une longueur de 15 à 18 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
384/1993.34987

___________

Full article and photos: http://www.mcq.org/audubon/catalogue/audubon_001.html

The Birds of America

Selasphorus rufus  Colibri roux  /  Rufous Hummingbird

audubon_379

The Rufous Hummingbird is the only variety of its species that nests in the northern part of North America, as far as the Yukon and Alaska. Found at low altitudes along the Pacific coast, West of the Rocky Mountains, it migrates southward in the winter, to reach Mexico. It feeds mainly on flowers – such as columbines and tiger lilies, for instance – and sap. The length of the Rufous Hummingbird is 10 cm.

Le colibri roux est le seul de son espèce à nicher au Nord du continent, et ce, jusqu’au Yukon et en Alaska. Observé à basse altitude le long de la côte du Pacifique, à l’ouest des montagnes Rocheuses, il migre vers le sud, en saison hivernale, pour rejoindre le Mexique. Il se nourrit principalement de fleurs, tels que l’ancolie du Canada et le lis tigré plus exactement, et de sève. Le colibri roux a une longueur de 10 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
379/1993.34982

__________

Ægolius funereus  Nyctale de Tengmalm  /  Boreal Owl  

audubon_380

A night-hunting and sedentary bird, the Boreal Owl nests in boreal and mixed forests, on the Îles-de-la-Madeleine, in Acadia and on Cape Breton island. It diet is varied and made up of voles, shrews, mice, birds, frogs and insects. During the winter, it visits other regions close to its nesting area. The length of the Boreal Owl is 22 to 27 cm.

Oiseau nocturne et sédentaire, le nyctale de Tengmalm niche en forêts boréale et mixte, aux Îles-de-la-Madeleine, en Acadie et à l’Île du Cap-Breton. Son régime alimentaire est varié et se compose de campagnols, de musaraignes, de souris, d’oiseaux, de grenouilles et d’insectes. En hiver, il visite d’autres régions à proximité de son aire de nidification. Le nyctale de Tengmalm a une longueur de 22 à 27 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
380/1993.34983
___________
Anser cærulescens  Oie des neiges  /  Snow Goose  
audubon_381

The habitat of the Snow Goose includes the watercourses and the shallow ponds and lakes of the Arctic tundra. A migratory bird, it travels in enormous flocks along an axis leading from the Arctic to the State of Virginia in the United States. In the spring and the fall, it stages a halt along the Saint Lawrence River, especially around Cap-Tourmente, to get some brief rest! A vegetarian, the Snow Goose feeds on Scirpus rhizomes and seeds. Its length is 64 to 76 cm.

L’oie des neiges a pour habitat les cours d’eau, les étangs et les lacs peu profonds de la toundra arctique. Migratrice, elle voyage en immenses volées sur un axe la menant de l’Arctique à l’état de la Virginie, aux États-Unis. Au printemps et à l’automne, elle fait halte le long du fleuve Saint-Laurent, au Cap-Tourmente entre autres, question de souffler un moment! Végétarienne, l’oie des neiges s’alimente de rhizomes du scirpe d’Amérique et de grains. Elle a une longueur de 64 à 76 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
381/1993.34984

__________
Full article and photos: http://www.mcq.org/audubon/catalogue/audubon_001.html

The Birds of America

Cygnus buccinator  Cygne trompette  /  Trumpeter Swan

audubon_376

The territory of the Trumpeter Swan is the northern part of North America. Present in Alaska and the Yukon, it nests more commonly in Alberta where large colonies are found. During the winter, it can be seen on the stretches of smooth water bordering the coasts of British Columbia, and in the United States – more specifically in Ohio, Wyoming and Montana. It feeds mostly on leaves, insects, crustaceans, tubers, and the rhizomes of aquatic plants that it finds in shallow water. Though the species is no longer threatened, certain factors do not act in its favour: humans, eagles and owls, coyotes and mink, diseases and parasites, meteorological conditions, food shortages and lead poisoning. The length of the Trumpeter Swan is 152 cm and its wingspan is 300 cm.

Le cygne trompette a pour territoire le nord de l’Amérique du Nord. Présent en Alaska et au Yukon, il niche davantage en Alberta où l’on retrouve d’importantes colonies. En période hivernale, on le croise sur les plans d’eau longeant les côtes de la Colombie-Britannique, et aux États-Unis, en Ohio, au Wyoming et au Montana plus exactement. Il s’alimente surtout de feuilles, d’insectes, de crustacés, de tubercules et de rhizomes de plantes aquatiques qu’il trouve en eau peu profonde. Bien que l’espèce ne soit plus menacée, certains facteurs ne lui sont pas favorables : les humains, les aigles et les hiboux, les coyotes et les visons, les maladies et les parasites, les conditions météorologiques, les pénuries de nourriture et les empoisonnements au plomb. Le cygne trompette a une longueur de 152 cm et une envergure de 300 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
376/1993.34979

__________

Aramus guarauna   Courlan brun  /  Limpkin

audubon_377

A tall wading bird with a long neck and a limping walk, the Limpkin lives in the swamps of the southern United States. Its diet is mainly made up of snails, frogs and insects. The length of the Limpkin is 66 cm.

Grand échassier à long cou et à la démarche boiteuse, le courlan brun fréquente les marécages du sud des États-Unis. Son régime alimentaire se compose essentiellement d’escargots, de grenouilles et d’insectes. Le courlan brun a une longueur de 66 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
377/1993.34980
___________
Surnia ulula  Chouette épervière  /  Northern Hawk Owl  
audubon_378

The habitat of the Northern Hawk Owl covers the Canadian provinces. It is found all year round in the boreal forest and around the edges of peat bogs and other open environments. A great hunter, it goes into action by day as well as by night and mainly attacks shrews, but it is not uncommon to see it capture squirrels, frogs, fish and small birds. Renowned for its swooping flight at ground level, the Northern Hawk Owl is 37 to 43 cm in length.

La chouette épervière a pour habitat les provinces canadiennes. On l’observe à l’année dans la forêt boréale et le long de tourbières et d’autres milieux ouverts. Grande chasseresse, elle s’exécute le jour comme la nuit et s’attaque surtout aux musaraignes, mais il n’est pas rare de la voir capturer des écureuils, des grenouilles, des poissons et des petits oiseaux. Reconnue pour son vol au ras du sol, la chouette épervière a une longueur de 37 à 43 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
378/1993.34981
__________

The Birds of America

Pheucticus melanocephalus  Cardinal à tête noire  /  Black-headed Grosbeak  

Coccothraustes vespertinus  Gros-bec errant /  Evening Grosbeak  

audubon_373

The Black-headed Grosbeak and the Evening Grosbeak do not appear to share any points in common. Characterised by its large triangular beak, the Black-headed Grosbeak lives in the clear wooded areas and the edges of forests in the American West, whereas the Evening Grosbeak prefers by far the mixed and conifer forests throughout the entire North-American territory. It will even go as far as migrate to the Gulf of Mexico to find its diet that is made up of grassy plants, fruits and insects. Discovered about 140 years ago in the Rocky Mountains, the Evening Grosbeak is 18 to 22 cm in length, whereas the Black-headed Grosbeak’s length is 21 cm.

Le cardinal à tête noir et le gros-bec errant ne semblent pas avoir de points en commun. Caractérisé par son gros bec triangulaire, le cardinal habite les bois clairs et l’orée des forêts de l’Ouest américain, tandis que le gros-bec préfère de loin les forêts de conifères et mixtes de tout le territoire nord-américain. Il va même jusqu’à migrer dans le golfe du Mexique pour y retrouver son régime alimentaire qui est composé de plantes herbacées, de fruits et d’insectes. Découvert il y a environ 140 ans dans les montagnes Rocheuses, le gros-bec errant a une longueur de 18 à 22 cm et le cardinal à tête noire a, pour sa part, une longueur de 21 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
373/1993.34976
__________
Accipiter striatus  Épervier brun  /  Sharp-shinned Hawk

audubon_374

A nesting bird in the Unted States and Québec, the Sharp-shinned Hawk lives in dense conifer forests and mixed forests. A raptor, it feeds mainly on small birds, but complements its diet with frogs, lizards, small mammals and large insects. Solitary by nature, it is found in small groups during the migration period. The length of the Sharp-shinned Hawk is 25 to 35 cm and its wingspan is 51 to 71 cm.

Oiseau nicheur des États-Unis et du Québec, l’épervier brun habite les forêts denses de conifères et les forêts mixtes. Rapace, il se nourrit principalement de petits oiseaux mais complète son régime alimentaire par des grenouilles, des lézards, des petits mammifères et des gros insectes. De nature solitaire, on peut le voir en petits groupes en période de migration. L’épervier brun a une longueur de 25 à 36 cm et une envergure de 51 à 71 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
374/1993.34977
__________
Carduelis flammea  Sizerin flammé  /  Common Redpoll  
audubon_375

Not very fearful, the Common Redpoll has a quasi-vegetarian diet. It feeds on buds, cone seeds, weeds, grassy plants, and occasional insects. Living in the Canadian North and the Arctic, it nests in the scrubby tundra. During the winter, it migrates toward southern Québec, the Maritimes and the northern United States, where it gladly visits feeding dishes to get its nourishment. The length of the Common Redpoll is 14 cm.

Peu farouche, le sizerin flammé a une alimentation quasi végétale. Il se nourrit de bourgeons, de graines de cônes, de mauvaises herbes, de plantes herbacées et, quelques fois, d’insectes. Habitant le Nord canadien et l’Arctique, il niche dans la toundra broussailleuse. En hiver, il migre dans le sud du Québec, dans les Maritimes et dans le nord des États-Unis, où il fréquente allègrement les mangeoires afin de se nourrir. Le sizerin flammé a une longueur de 14 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
375/1993.34978

__________

Full article and photos: http://www.mcq.org/audubon/catalogue/audubon_375.html

The Birds of America

Cinclus mexicanus  Cincle d’Amérique  /  American Dipper

audubon_370

Solitary, plump and vigorous, the American Dipper is common in the North-American West. It lives and feeds in mountain torrents and along wood-bordering rivers. Its length is19 cm.

Solitaire, rondelet et vigoureux, le cincle d’Amérique est commun dans l’ouest de l’Amérique du Nord. Il habite et se nourrit dans les torrents montagneux et les rivières limitrophes aux forêts. Il a une longueur de 19 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
370/1993.34973
__________
Centrocercus wrophasianus  Tétras des armoises ou Gélinotte des armoises  /  Sage Grouse  
audubon_371

The territory of the Sage Grouse includes the south-western United States and the Alberta and Saskatchewan prairies. Common in shrubbery, foothills and plains, it likes vast expanses. During the mating period, this Grouse is the most majestic variety of its species. The male, proud and dignified, swells the great sacs on either side of its neck, spreads its tail feathers and displays a ruff of white feathers. Then, jigging quickly in place, it produces a drumming-like sound, announcing to the female that the courting parade is about to begin. The length of the Sage Grouse is 71 cm.

Le tétras des armoises a pour territoire le sud-ouest des États-Unis et les prairies de l’Alberta et de la Saskatchewan. Commun dans les buissons, les contreforts et les plaines, il aime les grandes étendues. En période nuptiale, ce tétras est le plus majestueux de son espèce. Le mâle, fier et digne, gonfle de grands sacs situés de chaque côté du cou, étale sa queue et redresse une collerette de plumes blanches. Piétinant rapidement sur place par la suite, il émet un son rappelant celui du tambour, annonçant à la femelle que la parade nuptiale va commencer. Le tétras des armoises a une longueur de 71 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
371/1993.34974
__________

Buteo Swainsoni  Buse de Swainson  /  Swainson’s Hawk

audubon_372

A bird of prey of the plains, prairies and deserts, Swainson’s Hawk feeds on small rodents and insects, crickets and grasshoppers more specifically. It nests in the western United States during the nesting period, but lives in perpetual migration during the rest of the year. Indeed, it flies over a distance of 20 000 km to reach the Argentine pampas, those vast plains where it will spent the winter. The length of Swainson’s Hawk is 53 cm and its wingspan is 132 cm.

Oiseau rapace des plaines, des prairies et des déserts, la buse de Swainson s’alimente de petits rongeurs et d’insectes, de criquets et de sauterelles plus exactement. Elle niche dans l’ouest des États-Unis, en période de nidification, mais vit en perpétuelle migration le reste de l’année. En effet, elle vole une distance de 20 000 km pour atteindre les pampas de l’Argentine, de vastes prairies où elle passera l’hiver. La buse de Swainson a une longueur de 53 cm et une envergure de 132 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
372/1993.34975

___________

Full article and photos: http://www.mcq.org/audubon/catalogue/audubon_001.html

The Birds of America

Columba fasciata  Pigeon à queue barrée ou Pigeon du Pacifique  /  Band-tailed Pigeon  

audubon_367

The Band-tailed Pigeon is a common species throughout western North America. Sedentary, it nests in pine and oak forests that range from British Columbia to Mexico. Although its population is on the rise in parks and surburban areas, the reproduction rate of this pigeon is the lowest among all North-American game birds. Only one egg is found per brood, and there is one single brood a year. The length of the Band-tailed Pigeon is 37 cm.

Le pigeon à queue barrée ou pigeon du Pacifique est une espèce commune dans tout l’ouest de l’Amérique du Nord. Sédentaire, il niche dans les forêts de pins et de chênes qui s’étendent de la Colombie-Britannique au Mexique. Bien que sa population soit à la hausse dans les parcs et les banlieues, le taux de reproduction de ce pigeon est le plus faible de tous les oiseaux-gibiers nord-américains. On ne recense qu’un seul œuf par couvée et il n’y a qu’une couvée par année. Le pigeon à queue barrée a une longueur de 37 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
367/1993.34970
__________
Lagopus mutus  Lagopède alpin (2 oiseaux au plumage d’été et 1 oiseau au plumage d’hiver)  /  Ptarmigan (2 birds in Summer Plumage and 1 in Winter plumage) 
_____ 
audubon_368
The Ptarmigan nests essentially in the tundra and the high rocky slopes of northern Canada. In Audubon’s time, an impressive number of Ptarmigans were killed every year. It is said that in Canada and Scandinavia, 300 birds could be hunted every day. Not especially fearful, the Ptarmigans that survived gunshots would only move aside a short distance, thus still remaining extremely easy prey. The length of the ptarmigan is 36 cm.

Le lagopède alpin niche essentiellement dans la toundra et les hauts versants rocheux du nord du Canada. À l’époque d’Audubon, un nombre impressionnant de lagopèdes étaient tués chaque année. On raconte qu’au Canada et en Scandinavie, 300 oiseaux pouvaient être chassés chaque jour. Peu farouches, les lagopèdes survivants des coups de fusils ne s’éloignaient que de quelques pas seulement, demeurant toujours des proies extrêmement faciles. Le lagopède alpin a une longueur de 36 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
368/1993.34971
__________
Zoothera nævia  Grive à collier  /  Varied Thrush
 
Oreoscoptes montanus  Moqueur des armoises  /  Sage Thrasher
_____  
audubon_369

Nesting birds of the American West, the Varied Thrush can stray towards the eastern United States during the winter, while the Sage Thrasher is rather uncommon there. Indeed, the latter bird is comfortable in its Artemisia plains, whereas the Varied Thrush changes its habitat, nesting in thick, humid woods as well as in conifer forests. Both seek their food in trees. The length of the Varied Thrush is 24 cm and the Sage Thrasher’s length is 22 cm.

Oiseaux nicheurs de l’Ouest américain, la grive à collier peut errer vers l’est des États-Unis, en hiver, alors que le moqueur des armoises y est plutôt inusité. En effet, ce dernier se complait dans ses plaines d’armoises alors que la grive change d’habitat, nidifiant à la fois dans les bois épais et humides et les forêts de conifères. Tous deux s’alimentent dans les arbres. La grive à collier a une longueur de 24 cm et le moqueur des armoises a une longueur de 22 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
369/1993.34972

__________
Full article and photos: http://www.mcq.org/audubon/catalogue/audubon_001.html

The Birds of America

Loxia leucoptera  Bec-croisé bifascié  /  White-winged Crossbill

audubon_364

The White-winged Crossbill nests all year round throughout the territory of Québec. Its habitat includes the boreal and conifer forests. Besides, it is so comfortable there that in New Brunswick’s lumber camps, it serves as a mascot! Its diet is rather varied, and made up of seeds of spruce, larch, birch and alder, with insects and fruits. The length of the White-winged Crossbill is 15 to 17 cm.

Le bec-croisé bifascié niche à l’année dans tout le territoire québécois. Il a pour habitat les forêts boréales et de conifères. Il s’y sent d’ailleurs si à l’aise que dans les camps de bûcherons du Nouveau-Brunswick, il est utilisé comme mascotte! Son régime alimentaire est assez varié, se composant de graines d’épinette, de mélèze, de bouleau et d’aulne, d’insectes et de fruits. Le bec-croisé bifascié a une longueur de 15 à 17 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
364/1993.34967

__________

Calcarius lapponicus  Bruant lapon  /  Lapland Longspur  

audubon_365

A nesting bird of the Arctic tundra, the Lapland Longspur’s winter habitat includes the grassy fields, stubble fields and shorelines of the Maritimes and southern Québec. It feeds on insects, spiders and seeds, that it finds mostly on the ground. The fledgling feeds only on insects. The length of the Lapland Longspur is 15 to 18 cm.

Oiseau nicheur de la toundra Arctique, le bruant lapon a pour habitat hivernal les champs herbeux, les chaumes et les rivages des Maritimes et de la zone sud du Québec. Il s’alimente d’insectes, d’araignées et de graines qu’il trouve essentiellement au sol. Le jeune oisillon, quant à lui, ne consomme que des insectes. Le bruant lapon a une longueur de 15 à 18 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
365/1993.34968
__________
Falco rusticolus  Faucon gerfaut (mâle et femelle : plumage d’hiver)  /  Gyrfalcon (male and female : Winter plumage)

audubon_366

The Gyrfalcon is the largest and most powerful of falcons. A bird of prey, it is a true inhabitant of the Great North. It nests near the Arctic and Greenland, but the Ungava region remains its fiefdom par excellence. Its diet is made up mainly of birds in their reproductive period, but it also feeds on mammals and ducks that it spots from high up or while skimming the ground. Robust and proud, the Gyrfalcon is the prince of raptors in the world of falconry. Its length is 51 to 64 cm and its wingspan reaches 127 to 163 cm.

Le faucon gerfaut est le plus grand et le plus puissant des faucons. Oiseau rapace, il est un véritable habitant du Grand Nord. Il niche près de l’Arctique et du Groenland, mais l’Ungava demeure son fief par excellence. Son régime alimentaire se compose principalement d’oiseaux en période de reproduction, mais il se nourrit également de mammifères et de canards qu’il repère du haut des airs ou en survolant le sol. Robuste et fier, le faucon gerfaut est le prince des rapaces dans le monde de la fauconnerie. Sa longueur est de 51 à 64 cm et son envergure de 127 à 163 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
366/1993.34969

__________

Full article and photos: http://www.mcq.org/audubon/catalogue/audubon_001.html

The Birds of America

Dendragapus obscurus  Tétras sombre  /  Blue Grouse  

audubon_361

The Blue Grouse is found all year round in the North-American West. It lives in clear, mixed, and conifer forests as well as in the shrubbery of the lowlands and slopes. The length of the Blue Grouse is 51 cm.

Le tétras sombre s’observe à l’année dans l’Ouest de l’Amérique du Nord. Il habite les forêts claires, mixtes et de conifères ainsi que les terrains broussailleux des basses terres et des versants. Le tétras sombre a une longueur de 51 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
361/1993.34964
___________
Nucifraga columbiana  Casse-noix d’Amérique  /  Clark’s Nutcracker
 
Aphelocoma cœrulescens  Geai à gorge blanche  /  Scrub Jay
 
Cyanocitta stelleri  Geai de Steller  /  Steller’s Jay
 
Pica nuttalli  Pie à bec jaune  /  Yellow-billed Magpie 

audubon_362

Clark’s Nutcracker, the Scrub Jay, Steller’s Jay and the Yellow-billed Magpie all have as their territory the American West. They are usually found in pine or oak groves, cultivated fields and camping grounds, where they can find a veriety of acorns, seeds, pine cones, insects and fruits. Whereas the Yellow-billed Magpie replaces the Black-billed Magpie in the California valleys, the Scrub Jay and Steller’s Jay are renowned for being aggressive species. The length of Clark’s Nutcracker is 31 cm, the Scrub Jay’s length is 29 cm, the length of Steller’s Jay is 30 cm, and the Yellow-billed Magpie is 42 cm in length.

Le casse-noix d’Amérique, le geai à gorge blanche, le geai de Steller et la pie à bec jaune ont tous pour territoire l’Ouest américain. On les croise habituellement dans les pinèdes et les chênaies, les champs cultivés et les terrains de camping, là où l’on retrouve une variété de glands, de graines, de pommes de pins, d’insectes et de fruits. Alors que la pie à bec jaune remplace la pie bavarde dans les vallées californiennes, le geai à gorge blanche et le geai de Steller sont reconnus pour être des espèces agressives. Le casse-noix d’Amérique a une longueur de 31 cm, le geai à gorge blanche a une longueur de 29 cm, le geai de Steller mesure 30 cm de longueur et la pie à bec jaune a 42 cm de longueur.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
362/1993.34965
__________
Bombycilla garrulus  Jaseur boréal  /  Bohemian Waxwing

audubon_363

A nesting bird of the boreal forest and the conifer forest, the Bohemian Waxwing has the northern part of the Abitibi region as its habitat. Found during the winter in all the regions of Québec and the Maritimes, it feeds on a variety of wild fruits, flower petals, insects, and small berries. Once filled up, the Bohemian Waxwing is often too heavy to fly off, which explains why it is so often seen lounging on a branch or on the grass of a lawn. The length of the Bohemian Waxwing is 19 to 22 cm.

Oiseau nicheur de la forêt boréale et de la forêt de conifères, le jaseur boréal a pour habitat le nord de l’Abitibi. Observé en hiver dans toutes les régions du Québec et des Maritimes, il se nourrit d’une variété de fruits sauvages, de pétales de fleurs, d’insectes et de petits baies. Une fois rassasié, le jaseur boréal est souvent trop lourd pour s’envoler, ce qui explique pourquoi on le voit si fréquemment flâner sur une branche d’arbre ou sur la pelouse. Le jaseur boréal a une longueur de 19 à 22 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
363/1993.34966

__________

Full article and photos: http://www.mcq.org/audubon/catalogue/audubon_001.html

The Birds of America

Pinicola enucleator  Durbec des sapins  /  Pine Grosbeak  

audubon_358

A plump bird with a strong, robust beak, the Pine Grosbeak lives all year round in Québec and in the northern mountains of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. It nests in conifer forests, clearings and woods, where it can feed on seeds, buds, insects and fruits. Not especially fearful, it will also visit feeding dishes. The length of the Pine Grosbeak is 23 to 25 cm.

Oiseau rondelet au bec robuste et fort, le durbec des sapins habite à l’année le Québec et les montagnes au nord du Nouveau-Brunswick et de la Nouvelle-Écosse. Il niche dans les forêts de conifères, les clairières et les bois, là où il peut s’alimenter de graines, de bourgeons, d’insectes et de fruits. Peu farouche, il visite également les mangeoires. Le durbec des sapins a une longueur de 23 à 25 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
358/1993.34961
___________
Sayornis Saya  Moucherolle à ventre roux  /  Say’s Phœbe
 
Tyrannus forficatus  Tyran à longue queue  /  Scissor-tailed Flycatcher  
 
Tyrannus verticalis  Tyran de l’Ouest  /  Western Kingbird  
audubon_359

Say’s Phœbe, the Scissor-tailed Flycatcher and the Western Kingbird are common birds in open and dry terrains. While Say’s Phœbe is found in the Canadian West and the American South-West, the Scissor-tailed Flycatcher is found in the eastern United States and in Central America, during the winter. The Western Kingbird nests in the American West and Midwest and spends the winter in southern Florida. The length of Say’s Phœbe is 19 cm, the Scissor-tailed Flycatcher’s is 33 cm, and the Western Kingbird is 22 cm in length.

Le moucherolle à ventre roux, le tyran à longue queue et le tyran de l’Ouest sont des oiseaux communs en terrains ouverts et secs. Alors que l’on observe le moucherolle dans l’Ouest canadien et le Sud-Ouest américain, on croise le tyran à longue queue dans l’est des États-Unis et en Amérique Centrale, en hiver. Le tyran de l’ouest, pour sa part, se nidifie dans le Midwest et l’Ouest américains et hiverne dans le sud de la Floride. Le moucherolle à ventre roux a une longueur de 19 cm, le tyran à longue queue a une longueur de 33 cm et le tyran de l’Ouest a une longueur de 22 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
359/1993.34962
__________
Salpinctes obsoletus  Troglodyte des rochers  /  Rock Wren  
 
Troglodytes troglodytes  Troglodyte mignon ou Troglodyte des forêts  /  Winter Wren  
audubon_360
The only thing the Rock Wren and the Winter Wren have in common is that name! Indeed, the Rock Wren’s territory is the western zone of North America, and it nests in arid and semi-arid environments such as fallen rock and shrubbery. The Winter Wren, by contrast, prefers the dense and humid conifer forests of southern Québec and the Maritimes. This furtive bird feeds on insects and spiders that it finds on the ground, near felled trees or in the foliage. The length of the Rock Wren is 15 cm, while the length of the Winter Wren is 10 to 11 cm.

Le troglodyte des rochers et le troglodyte mignon ne partagent que le nom! En effet, le premier a pour territoire la zone ouest de l’Amérique du Nord et niche dans les lieux arides et semi-arides, les éboulis et les broussailles par exemple. Le second, pour sa part, préfère les forêts de conifères denses et humides du sud du Québec et des Maritimes. Furtif, cet oiseau se nourrit d’insectes et d’araignées qu’il trouve au sol, près d’arbres abattus ou dans le feuillage. Le troglodyte des rochers a une longueur de 15 cm tandis que le troglodyte mignon a une longueur de 10 à 11 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
360/1993.34963

__________

Full article and photos: http://www.mcq.org/audubon/catalogue/audubon_001.html

The Birds of America

Ammodramus maritimus  Bruant maritime  /  Seaside Sparrow  

audubon_355

Common in grassy marshes, the Seaside Sparrow’s habitat is the East Coast of the United States. During the winter season, it nests only a few kilometres to the south of its annual territory. The length of the Seaside Sparrow is 15 cm.

Commun dans les marais herbeux, le bruant maritime a pour habitat la côte est des États-Unis. En saison hivernale, il niche à quelques kilomètres seulement au sud de son territoire annuel. Le bruant maritime a une longueur de 15 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
355/1993.34958
__________
Circus Cyaneus  Busard Saint-Martin  /  Northern Harrier  

audubon_356

A slender bird of prey, the Northern Harrier feeds on moles and other small mammals that it hunts by flying close to the ground. A raptor, it varies its diet by occasionally eating frogs and snakes that it captures in the freshwater marshes and the fields of southern Québec and the Maritimes. During the winter, it is commonly found in the Saint Lawrence Valley, in the Estrie region and in the southern parts of the Maritime provinces. The length of the Northern Harrier is 45 to 61 cm and its wingspan is 97 to 122 cm.

Oiseau de proie svelte, le busard Saint-Martin se nourrit de mulots et autres petits mammifères qu’il chasse en volant au ras du sol. Rapace, il varie son régime alimentaire en consommant, à l’occasion, des grenouilles et des couleuvres qu’il capture dans les marais d’eau douce et les champs du Québec méridional et des Maritimes. En hiver, il est fréquent de le rencontrer dans la vallée du Saint-Laurent, dans l’Estrie et dans le sud des provinces maritimes. Le busard Saint-Martin a une longueur variant de 45 à 61 cm et une envergure de 97 à 122 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
356/1993.34959
___________
Pica pica  Pie bavarde  /  Black-billed Magpie  
audubon_357

Distrustful of humans, the Black-billed Magpie is common throughout Eurasia and, in North America, it exists only in the North-West. It is believed to have come down this far from Alaska, following the last great glaciation. Omnivorous, it feeds on insects, ticks, fruits and carrion. Sometimes, it will even attack eggs and fledglings. Its length is 45 cm.

Méfiante vis-à-vis des humains, la pie bavarde est répandue dans toute l’Eurasie et n’existe, en Amérique du Nord, que dans le Nord-Ouest. On croit qu’elle est parvenue jusqu’à nous depuis l’Alaska, après la dernière grande glaciation. Omnivore, elle mange des insectes, des tiques, des fruits et de la charogne. Quelques fois, elle peut même s’attaquer à des œufs et à des oisillons. Elle mesure 45 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
357/1993.34960

__________

Full article and photos: http://www.mcq.org/audubon/catalogue/audubon_001.html

The Birds of America

Elanus cæruleus  Élanion blanc  /  Black-shouldered Kite  

audubon_352

Common in scrublands, in fields and along the edges of highways, the Black-shouldered Kite has its territorial range in the South and along the West Coast of the United States. It feeds essentially on insects and rodents that it hunts by hovering in place. The length of the Black-shouldered Kite is 41 cm and its wingspan is 107 cm.

Commun dans les prairies broussailleuses, les champs et le long des autoroutes, l’élanion blanc a pour territoire le sud et la côte ouest des États-Unis. Il se nourrit essentiellement d’insectes et de rongeurs qu’il chasse en volant en « sur place ». L’élanion blanc a une longueur de 41 cm et une envergure de 107 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
352/1993.34955
__________
Psaltriparus minimus  Mésange buissonnière  /  Bushtit  
 
Parus atricapillus  Mésange à tête noire  /  Black-capped Chickadee
 
Parus rufescens  Mésange à dos marron  /  Chestnut-backed Chickadee 

audubon_353

The Bushtit, the Black-caped Chickadee and the Chestnut-backed Chickadee feed on various insects, spiders, seeds and small fruits. Nesting birds, they are found in the leafy and conifer forests, clear wooded areas and clearings of the American and Canadian West. Only the Black-capped Chickadee can be found in southern Québec and in the Maritimes. This latter bird is the aviary emblem of New Brunswick. The length of the Bushtit is 11 cm, the Black-capped Chickadee’s is 12 to 15 cm, and the Chestnut-backed Chickadee’s length is 12 cm.

La mésange buissonnière, la mésange à tête noire et la mésange à dos marron se nourrissent d’insectes variés, d’araignées, de graines et de petits fruits. Oiseaux nicheurs, on les retrouve dans les forêts de feuillus et de conifères, dans les bois clairs et les clairières de l’Ouest américain et canadien. Seule la mésange à tête noire peut être croisée dans le Québec méridional et dans les Maritimes. D’ailleurs, cette dernière est l’oiseau emblématique du Nouveau-Brunswick. La mésange buissonnière a une longueur de 11 cm, la mésange à tête noire a une longueur variant de 12 à 15 cm et la mésange à dos marron a une longueur de 12 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
353/1993.34956
__________
Piranga olivacea  Tangara écarlate  /  Scarlet Tanager
 
Piranga ludoviciana  Tangara à tête rouge  /  Western Tanager

audubon_354

Though the first bird is timid and the second one discreet, the Scarlet Tanager and the Western Tanager share visibly similar diets. Indeed, both feed on the insects, fruits and buds they find in leafy forests and conifer forests. While the first is found in eastern Canada during the nesting period, and in the north-western part of South America during the winter season, the second bird is found more commonly in the western part of North America during the nesting period and along the American South Coast during the winter. The average length of both the Scarlet Tanager and the Western Tanager is 18 cm.

Que le premier soit timide et que le second soit discret, le tangara écarlate et le tangara à tête rouge ont un régime alimentaire visiblement similaire. En effet, tous deux se nourrissent d’insectes, de fruits et de bourgeons qu’ils trouvent en forêts de feuillus et en forêts de conifères. Alors que l’on observe le premier dans l’Est canadien en période de nidification et au nord-ouest de l’Amérique du Sud en saison hivernale, on croise davantage le second à l’ouest de l’Amérique du Nord en période de nidification et le long de la côte Sud américaine en hiver. Le tangara écarlate et le tangara à tête rouge ont une longueur moyenne de 18 cm.

Musée de la civilisation,
collection du Séminaire de Québec,
The Birds of America,
John James Audubon,
354/1993.34957

___________

Full article and photos: http://www.mcq.org/audubon/catalogue/audubon_001.html